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dc.contributor.authorGuermazi, Ali
dc.contributor.authorHayashi, Daichi
dc.contributor.authorEckstein, Felix
dc.contributor.authorHunter, David J.
dc.contributor.authorDuryea, Jeff
dc.contributor.authorRoemer, Frank W.
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-28T05:24:12Z
dc.date.available2014-01-28T05:24:12Z
dc.date.issued2013-02
dc.identifier.citationImaging of osteoarthritis. Guermazi A - Rheum Dis Clin North Am - 01-FEB-2013; 39(1): 67-105en_AU
dc.identifier.issn1558-3163
dc.identifier.uri/das/journal/view/0/N/26061242?issn=0889-857X&source=MI
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/9948
dc.description.abstractOsteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent joint disorder in the elderly, and there is no effective treatment. Imaging is essential for evaluating the synovial joint structures (including cartilage, meniscus, subchondral bone marrow and synovium) for diagnosis, prognosis, and follow-up. This article describes the roles and limitations of both conventional radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and considers the use of other modalities (eg, ultrasonography, nuclear medicine, computed tomography [CT], and CT/MR arthrography) in clinical practice and OA research. The emphasis throughout is on OA of the knee. This article emphasizes research developments and literature evidence published since 2008.en_AU
dc.language.isoenen_AU
dc.publisherElsevieren_AU
dc.subjectOsteoarthritisen_AU
dc.subjectCartilageen_AU
dc.titleImaging of Osteoarthritisen_AU
dc.typeArticleen_AU
dc.subject.asrcFoR::110322 - Rheumatology and Arthritisen_AU
dc.type.pubtypePost-printen_AU


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