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dc.contributor.authorCama, Nicole
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-18T04:45:31Z
dc.date.available2010-01-18T04:45:31Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/5815
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the different ways madness was defined and treated in Italian texts from the early fifteenth century through to the late sixteenth century. Although this thesis investigates how and why people were categorised as mad, various sources have shown that the treatment of these individuals varied according to different social, cultural and political contexts. In some cases madness was seen as an undesirable expression of social deviance and in other cases, a venerated symbol of wisdom. In light of these discrepancies, social structures stigmatised and often alienated those considered ‘strano’ (‘strange’) acted as powerful punitive and organisational mechanisms.en_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesisen
dc.subjectrenaissance Italyen_AU
dc.subject'strano'en_AU
dc.subjectpublic responses to madnessen_AU
dc.subjectmadnessen_AU
dc.titleDefining the 'Strano': Madness in Renaissance Italyen_AU
dc.typeThesis, Honoursen_AU
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Historyen_AU


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