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dc.contributor.authorHill, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Rae
dc.contributor.authorBaird, Marian
dc.contributor.authorVromen, Ariadne
dc.contributor.authorProbyn, Elspeth
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-23T23:52:44Z
dc.date.available2019-10-23T23:52:44Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationHill, E., Cooper, R., Baird, M., Vromen, A., and Probyn, E. (2018) Australian Women's Working Futures: Are We Ready?en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2123/21259
dc.descriptionResearch paper to contribute to the discussions at a regional ‘Women and the Future of Work in the Asia-Pacific’ Conference to be held in Bangkok, Thailand from 31 January – 1 February 2018.en_US
dc.description.abstractAustralian governments have made gender equality in the workplace a priority, citing women’s enhanced engagement in the workforce as essential to raising living standards and securing Australia’s future prosperity (Commonwealth of Australia 2017). But Australian women and men do not participate in the labour market as equals, and employment and economic outcomes remain unequal and highly gendered. What will it take for gender equality to be part of the future of work in Australia? In this paper we report on the Australian Women’s Working Futures Project (AWWF) 2017. This new and unique study by an interdisciplinary team at The University of Sydney focuses on the experiences, values and aspirations of young working women aged 16-40 years. Young women are the core of the future workforce, but rarely the subject of research. The AWWF Project 2017 shows that young women value job security, predictable and regular hours, decent pay, and the opportunity for respect, control, and influence in the workplace. Access to the right skills and qualifications, support and mentoring, and paid leave to care for family are all cited as important to women’s future success at work. Young women are job-orientated and want to advance their careers. They actively plan for the future and intend to have children. But most women do not think they are treated the same as men at work and only half think gender equality at work will improve in the future. The AWWF Project 2017 shows many Australian workplaces are not providing young women with what they value or need to succeed in the workplace, and public policy settings are not ready to meet young women’s aspirations for the future of work. Government and business must urgently redouble efforts to promote legislative and policy initiatives that will deliver Australian working women gender equality in the future of work. The paper concludes with a number of policy recommendations.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Labour Organizationen_US
dc.language.isoen_AUen_US
dc.publisherInternational Labour Organization, Genevaen_US
dc.subjectwomen workersen_US
dc.subjectgender mainstreamingen_US
dc.subjectgender equalityen_US
dc.subjectwomens rightsen_US
dc.subjectgenderen_US
dc.subjectwomens empowermenten_US
dc.subjectFuture of worken_US
dc.titleAustralian Women's Working Futures: Are We Ready?en_US
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_US
dc.subject.asrcFoR::150308 - International Businessen_US
dc.subject.asrcFoR::150399 - Business and Management not elsewhere classifieden_US
dc.subject.asrcFoR::200205 - Culture, Gender, Sexualityen_US
dc.type.pubtypePre-printen_US


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