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dc.contributor.authorTimsina, J
dc.contributor.authorHumphreys, E
dc.contributor.authorSmith, D. J
dc.contributor.authorGoodwin, D
dc.contributor.authorQuayyum, M. A
dc.contributor.authorConnor, D. J
dc.date.accessioned2005-10-19T06:18:20Z
dc.date.available2005-10-19T06:18:20Z
dc.date.issued2005-10-19T06:18:20Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/132
dc.description.abstractCERES-wheat and SWAGMAN Destiny models, respectively, were used to estimate the optimum time of sowing, and trade-off between yield and net recharge of the watertable, for wheat grown after rice in northern Bangladesh and southern NSW, Australia. Simulated wheat yields in Bangladesh, for sowings from Sept to Jan, with two supplemental irrigations, ranged from 0.4 to 4.6 t/ha. November-sown crops yielded more than the earlier- or later-sown crops due to reduced water and heat stress during grain filling. In Australia, simulated yields of non-irrigated wheat were always greater for April than June sowings due to less water deficit at the end of the season. With an initial shallow (0.5 m), fresh (1 dS/m) watertable, simulated yields usually exceeded 3 t/ha, and declined as watertable salinity increased. Nonirrigated wheat almost always lowered the watertable. Frequent irrigation increased simulated yields to 5-6 t/ha, regardless of initial conditions and sowing date, but this was at the cost of decreased discharge or increased recharge leading to rising watertables.en
dc.format.extent711798 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProgram 1en
dc.subjectIrrigationen
dc.subjectCERES wheaten
dc.subjectSWAGMAN Destinyen
dc.subjectWatertableen
dc.subjectSalinityen
dc.subjectBangladeshen
dc.titleSimulation of Yield and Environmental Impacts of Wheat after Rice in Bangladesh and Australiaen
dc.typeOtheren


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