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dc.contributor.authorHunter, David J.
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-28T05:30:29Z
dc.date.available2014-01-28T05:30:29Z
dc.date.issued2013-02
dc.identifier.citationHunter DJ - Rheum Dis Clin North Am - 01-FEB-2013; 39(1): xv-xviiien_AU
dc.identifier.issn0889-857X
dc.identifier.uriHunter DJ - Rheum Dis Clin North Am - 01-FEB-2013; 39(1): xv-xviii
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/9949
dc.description.abstractOsteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of disability among older adults. It is an incredibly prevalent condition affecting upward of 1 in 8 adults. Societal trends in aging, obesity, and increasing joint injury will lead to a doubling of the number of persons with OA in the next decade. In this context, this issue of Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America is timely, as we envision this increasingly prevalent disabling condition in an era where health care expenditure is increasingly scrutinized.en_AU
dc.language.isoenen_AU
dc.publisherElsevieren_AU
dc.relationDr Hunter is funded by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship.en_AU
dc.subjectOsteoarthritisen_AU
dc.titleOsteoarthritis Prefaceen_AU
dc.typeArticleen_AU
dc.subject.asrcFoR::110322 - Rheumatology and Arthritisen_AU
dc.type.pubtypePost-printen_AU


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