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dc.contributor.authorGal, Ofer
dc.contributor.authorWolfe, Charles T.
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-07T03:31:08Z
dc.date.available2011-11-07T03:31:08Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.isbn978-90-481-3685-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/7875
dc.description.abstractIt was in 1660s England, according to the received view, in the Royal Society of London, that science acquired the form of empirical enquiry we recognize as our own: an open, collaborative experimental practice, mediated by specially-designed instruments, supported by civil discourse, stressing accuracy and replicability. Guided by the philosophy of Francis Bacon, by Protestant ideas of this worldly benevolence, by gentlemanly codes of decorum and by a dominant interest in mechanics and the mechanical structure of the universe, the members of the Royal Society created a novel experimental practice that superseded former modes of empirical inquiry, from Aristotelian observations to alchemical experimentation.en_AU
dc.language.isoenen_AU
dc.publisherSpringeren_AU
dc.subjectEarly Modern Scienceen_AU
dc.subjectRoyal Society of Londonen_AU
dc.subjectBaroque Scienceen_AU
dc.subjectalchemyen_AU
dc.subjectBaconen_AU
dc.subjectKepleren_AU
dc.subjectGalileoen_AU
dc.subjectDescartesen_AU
dc.subjectopticsen_AU
dc.subjectLockeen_AU
dc.subjectchymestryen_AU
dc.subjectBulweren_AU
dc.subjectmedicineen_AU
dc.subjectanatomyen_AU
dc.titleThe Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge:Embodied Empiricism in Early Modern Scienceen_AU
dc.typeBooken_AU
dc.subject.asrc220206en_AU
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-90-481-3686-5
dc.type.pubtypePublisher versionen_AU


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