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dc.contributor.authorDoran, Yaegan
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-13
dc.date.available2011-01-13
dc.date.issued2010-01-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/7116
dc.description.abstractPhysics is arguably the most fundamental of the sciences, yet many students disengage with it at a very early level. This thesis lays the groundwork to understanding why this is the case by using Systemic Functional theory to study how knowledge is conveyed to students within two undergraduate physics textbooks. Further to this, it uses Bernstein’s (1999) notion of ‘knowledge structure’ to describe the nature of knowledge within the discipline of physics itself. The thesis finds that mathematics and images work with written language to convey technical knowledge. Moreover, these semiotic resources can become technical, transcending the text to become part of the assumed knowledge of the field. Finally, it shows that mathematics in particular allows physics to integrate its various sub-fields and produce general theories that can be applied to real world. This thesis presents the first attempt using linguistic analysis at describing the nature of physics and how it is recontextualised for pedagogical purposes. As part of this, the thesis extends multiple theoretical frameworks including multimodality, theory of knowledge and genre theory.en_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesisen
dc.subjectSystemic Functional Linguisticsen_AU
dc.subjectMultimodalityen_AU
dc.subjectLegitimation Code Theoryen_AU
dc.subjectKnowledge Structureen_AU
dc.subjectPhysicsen_AU
dc.subjectGenreen_AU
dc.titleKnowledge and Multisemiosis in Undergraduate Physicsen_AU
dc.typeThesis, Honoursen_AU
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Linguisticsen_AU


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