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dc.contributor.authorKannan, Preeti
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-05T22:34:30Z
dc.date.available2011-01-05T22:34:30Z
dc.date.issued2011-01-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/7113
dc.description.abstractThe Right to Information Act was enacted in 2005 in India in response to citizens’ demand for access to information and keenness to stem corruption in the public sphere. Freedom of information is a recognised fundamental human right. There is a strong relationship between access to relevant information and people’s realisation of socio-economic rights. Despite the emphasis of a rights-based approach to development, often the poor and marginalised have little say in the development process. India, which has been heavily dependent on foreign aid for development since independence in 1947, is now an aid-giver while also being an aid recipient. The RTI Act, which started as a small social justice movement in a village in Rajasthan and became a nation-wide campaign for a legislation, “empowers Indian citizens to seek any accessible information from a public authority and makes the government and its functionaries more accountable and responsible.” This paper attempts to broaden the scope of the act by exploring the possibility of ‘adopting the RTI Act as a mechanism to fight corruption to promote effective aid delivery’ and ultimately aims at empowering Indian citizens – a core mandate of the legislation.en_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this work.en
dc.subjectIndiaen_AU
dc.subjectRight to Informationen_AU
dc.subjectCorruptionen_AU
dc.subjectAid deliveryen_AU
dc.titleAdopting the RTI Act as a mechanism to fight corruption to promote effective aid delivery in Indiaen_AU
dc.typeOtheren_AU
dc.contributor.departmentHuman Rights and Democratisationen_AU


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