Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorVeldre, Aaron
dc.contributor.authorReichle, Erik D.
dc.contributor.authorWong, Roslyn
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Sally
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-22T00:49:09Z
dc.date.available2020-01-22T00:49:09Z
dc.date.issued2020-04
dc.identifier.citationVeldre, A., Reichle, E. D., Wong, R., & Andrews, S. (2020). The effect of contextual plausibility on word skipping during reading. Cognition, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2020.104184197, 104184.en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2123/21728
dc.description.abstractRecent eye-movement evidence suggests readers are more likely to skip a high-frequency word than a low-frequency word independently of the semantic or syntactic acceptability of the word in the sentence. This has been interpreted as strong support for a serial processing mechanism in which the decision to skip a word is based on the completion of a preliminary stage of lexical processing prior to any assessment of contextual fit. The present large-scale study was designed to reconcile these findings with the plausibility preview effect: higher skipping and reduced first-pass reading times for words that are previewed by contextually plausible, compared to implausible, sentence continuations that are unrelated to the target word. Participants’ eye movements were recorded as they read sentences containing a short (3-4 letters) or long (6 letters) target word. The boundary paradigm was used to present parafoveal previews which were either higher or lower frequency than the target, and either plausible or implausible in the sentence context. The results revealed strong, independent effects of all three factors on target skipping and early measures of target fixation duration, while frequency and plausibility interacted on later measures of target fixation duration. Simulations using the E-Z Reader model of eye-movement control in reading demonstrated that plausibility effects on skipping are potentially consistent with the assumption that higher-level contextual information only affects post-lexical integration processes. However, no current model of eye movements in reading provides an explicit account of the information or processes that allow readers to rapidly detect an integration failure.en_AU
dc.language.isoen_USen_AU
dc.publisherElsevieren_AU
dc.relationARC DP160103224; DP190100719en_AU
dc.rights© 2020. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en_AU
dc.subjectEye movementsen_AU
dc.subjectReadingen_AU
dc.subjectWord skippingen_AU
dc.subjectPlausibility effectsen_AU
dc.subjectParafoveal processingen_AU
dc.subjectE-Z Readeren_AU
dc.titleThe effect of contextual plausibility on word skipping during readingen_AU
dc.typeArticleen_AU
dc.subject.asrcFoR::170204 - Linguistic Processes (incl. Speech Production and Comprehension)en_AU
dc.subject.asrcFoR::170112 - Sensory Processes, Perception and Performanceen_AU
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cognition.2020.104184
dc.type.pubtypePre-printen_AU


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record