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dc.contributor.authorRadford, K
dc.contributor.authorLavrencic, L
dc.contributor.authorDelbaere, K
dc.contributor.authorDraper, B
dc.contributor.authorCumming, R
dc.contributor.authorDaylight, G
dc.contributor.authorMack, H
dc.contributor.authorChalkley, S
dc.contributor.authorBennett, H
dc.contributor.authorGarvey, G
dc.contributor.authorHill, T
dc.contributor.authorLasschuit, D
dc.contributor.authorBroe, G
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T02:33:20Z
dc.date.available2019-09-10T02:33:20Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-17
dc.identifier.citationKylie Radford, Louise M. Lavrencic, Kim Delbaere, Brian Draper, Robert Cumming, Gail Daylight, … Gerald A. Broe. (2019). Factors Associated with the High Prevalence of Dementia in Older Aboriginal Australians. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, 70(s1), S75–S85. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-180573en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/21069
dc.description.abstractDementia prevalence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians is three to five times higher than the general Australian population. A better understanding of the underlying biomedical and social risk factors is needed to guide dementia prevention in Aboriginal Australians. The current study is the first to examine potential risk factors for dementia in the majority urban and regional population, with a representative sample of 336 Aboriginal Australians aged 60 years and older. Participants included 45 people with a dementia diagnosis (n = 27 probable/possible Alzheimer’s disease); and 286 people without dementia. Univariate logistic regression analyses (controlling for age) identified childhood trauma, mid-life factors (history of unskilled work, past high-risk alcohol use), and medical factors (history of stroke, head injury with loss of consciousness, epilepsy) as risk factors for dementia. Multivariable analysis revealed age, childhood trauma, unskilled work, stroke, and head injury as independent predictors of all-cause dementia. A range of comorbid factors related to dementia was also identified (i.e., functional impairment, incontinence, recent hospital admission, low body mass index, living in residential care, depression, current high-risk alcohol use, social isolation, low physical activity levels). These findings extend previous outcomes in a remote Aboriginal population by highlighting that life-course social determinants of health, in addition to neurological disorders, likely play an important role in elevating dementia risk. Certain psychosocial and medical exposures are highly prevalent in Aboriginal Australians, similar to other indigenous populations, and should be considered when designing targeted and culturally appropriate prevention initiatives to reduce the burden of dementia.en_AU
dc.description.sponsorshipNHMRC, NHMRC-ARC Dementia Research Development Fellowship, Serpentine Foundation Fellowshipen_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.publisherIOS Pressen_AU
dc.relationNHMRC 510347en_AU
dc.rightsThis is a pre-copyedited, author-produced version of an article accepted for publication in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease following peer review. The version of record Kylie Radford, Louise M. Lavrencic, Kim Delbaere, Brian Draper, Robert Cumming, Gail Daylight, … Gerald A. Broe. (2019). Factors Associated with the High Prevalence of Dementia in Older Aboriginal Australians. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, 70(s1), S75–S85. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-180573 is available online at: https://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-alzheimers-disease/jad180573.en_AU
dc.titleFactors associated with the high prevalence of dementia in older Aboriginal Australiansen_AU
dc.typeArticleen_AU
dc.subject.asrcFoR::111799 - Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classifieden_AU
dc.identifier.doi10.3233/JAD-180573
dc.type.pubtypePost-printen_AU


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