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dc.contributor.authorCao, Wenchao
dc.contributor.authorZahirovic, Sabin
dc.contributor.authorFlament, Nicolas
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Simon E
dc.contributor.authorGolonka, Jan
dc.contributor.authorMuller, R. Dietmar
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-14
dc.date.available2019-08-14
dc.date.issued2017-12-04
dc.identifier.citationCao, W., Zahirovic, S., Flament, N., Williams, S., Golonka, J., & Müller, R. D. (2017). Improving global paleogeography since the late Paleozoic using paleobiology. Biogeosciences, 14(23), 5425–5439. https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5425-2017en_AU
dc.identifier.issn17264170
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/20899
dc.description.abstractPaleogeographic reconstructions are important to understand Earth's tectonic evolution, past eustatic and regional sea level change, paleoclimate and ocean circulation, deep Earth resources and to constrain and interpret the dynamic topography predicted by mantle convection models. Global paleogeographic maps have been compiled and published, but they are generally presented as static maps with varying map projections, different time intervals represented by the maps and different plate motion models that underlie the paleogeographic reconstructions. This makes it difficult to convert the maps into a digital form and link them to alternative digital plate tectonic reconstructions. To address this limitation, we develop a workflow to restore global paleogeographic maps to their present-day coordinates and enable them to be linked to a different tectonic reconstruction. We use marine fossil collections from the Paleobiology Database to identify inconsistencies between their indicative paleoenvironments and published paleogeographic maps, and revise the locations of inferred paleo-coastlines that represent the estimated maximum transgression surfaces by resolving these inconsistencies. As a result, the consistency ratio between the paleogeography and the paleoenvironments indicated by the marine fossil collections is increased from an average of 75ĝ€% to nearly full consistency (100ĝ€%). The paleogeography in the main regions of North America, South America, Europe and Africa is significantly revised, especially in the Late Carboniferous, Middle Permian, Triassic, Jurassic, Late Cretaceous and most of the Cenozoic. The global flooded continental areas since the Early Devonian calculated from the revised paleogeography in this study are generally consistent with results derived from other paleoenvironment and paleo-lithofacies data and with the strontium isotope record in marine carbonates. We also estimate the terrestrial areal change over time associated with transferring reconstruction, filling gaps and modifying the paleogeographic geometries based on the paleobiology test. This indicates that the variation of the underlying plate reconstruction is the main factor that contributes to the terrestrial areal change, and the effect of revising paleogeographic geometries based on paleobiology is secondary. © Author(s) 2017.en_AU
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by Australian Research Council grants IH130200012 (RDM, SZ), DE160101020 (NF) and SIEF RP 04-174 (SW). W. Cao was also supported by a University of Sydney International Scholarship (USydIS). We thank Julia Sheehan and Logan Yeo for digitizing these paleogeographic maps, and John Cannon and Michael Chin for help with GPlates and pyGPlates. We sincerely thank Shanan Peters and three anonymous reviewers for their constructive reviews and suggestions. We thank Natascha Töpfer for editorial support and Tina Treude for editing the manuscript. We are also thankful for the entire PBDB team and all PBDB data contributors. This is Paleobiology Database Publication 296.en_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.publisherEuropean Geosciences Unionen_AU
dc.relationARC-DE160101020,IH130200012, Science and Industry Endowment Fund -SW,RP 04-174en_AU
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution License 3.0en_AU
dc.titleImproving global paleogeography since the late Paleozoic using paleobiologyen_AU
dc.typeArticleen_AU
dc.subject.asrc040313en_AU
dc.subject.asrc040402en_AU
dc.identifier.doi10.5194/bg-14-5425-2017
dc.type.pubtypePublisher versionen_AU


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