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dc.contributor.authorSalles, Tristan
dc.contributor.authorFlament, Nicolas
dc.contributor.authorMuller, R. Dietmar
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-12
dc.date.available2019-08-12
dc.date.issued2017-01-01
dc.identifier.citationSalles, T., N. Flament, and D. M€uller (2017), Influence of mantle flow on the drainage of eastern Australia since the Jurassic Period, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 18, 280–305, doi:10.1002/ 2016GC006617.en_AU
dc.identifier.issn15252027
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/20884
dc.descriptionThis research was undertaken with the assistance of resources from the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI), which is supported by the Australian Government. The results and data presented and discussed here were generated using Badlands model (http://github.com/badlands-model/badlands). Supporting information has been made available through GitHub (http://github.com/badlands-model/g-cubed-2016) and contain all the input and forcing conditions files required to reproduce the experiments published in this article.en_AU
dc.description.abstractRecent studies of the past eastern Australian landscape from present-day longitudinal river profiles and from mantle flow models suggest that the interaction of plate motion with mantle convection accounts for the two phases of large-scale uplift of the region since 120 Ma. We coupled the dynamic topography predicted from one of these mantle flow models to a surface process model to study the evolution of the eastern Australian landscape since the Jurassic Period. We varied the rainfall regime, erodibility, sea level variations, dynamic topography magnitude, and elastic thickness across a series of experiments. The approach accounts for erosion and sedimentation and simulates catchment dynamics. Despite the relative simplicity of our model, the results provide insights on the fundamental links between dynamic topography and continental-scale drainage evolution. Based on temporal and spatial changes in longitudinal river profiles as well as erosion and deposition maps, we show that the motion of the Australian plate over the convecting mantle has resulted in significant reorganization of the eastern Australian drainage. The model predicts that the Murray river drained eastward between 150 and ∼120 Ma, and switched to westward draining due to the tilting of the Australian plate from ∼120 Ma. First order comparisons of eight modeled river profiles and of the catchment shape of modeled Murray-Darling Basin are in agreement with present-day observations. The predicted denudation of the eastern highlands is compatible with thermochronology data and sedimentation rates along the southern Australian margin are consistent with cumulative sediment thickness. © 2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.en_AU
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Robert Moucha, Nicky White and an anonymous reviewer for their constructive comments and suggestions which have greatly improve this paper. The authors were supported by ARC grants IH130200012 and DE160101020.en_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_AU
dc.relationAustralian Research Council-DE160101020,IH130200012en_AU
dc.rights© 2017. American Geophysical Union.All Rights Reserved.en_AU
dc.subjectbasin formationen_AU
dc.subjectcatchment dynamicsen_AU
dc.subjectdrainage organizationen_AU
dc.subjectmantle flowen_AU
dc.subjectsurface processesen_AU
dc.titleInfluence of mantle flow on the drainage of eastern Australia since the Jurassic Perioden_AU
dc.typeArticleen_AU
dc.subject.asrc040399en_AU
dc.subject.asrc040499en_AU
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2016GC006617
dc.type.pubtypePublisher versionen_AU


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