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dc.contributor.authorSeton, Maria
dc.contributor.authorMortimer, Nick
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Simon
dc.contributor.authorQuilty, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorGans, Phil
dc.contributor.authorMeffre, Sebastien
dc.contributor.authorMicklethwaite, Steven
dc.contributor.authorZahirovic, Sabin
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Jarrod
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Kara J
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-01
dc.date.available2019-08-01
dc.date.issued2016-11-01
dc.identifier.citationSeton, M., Mortimer, N., Williams, S., Quilty, P., Gans, P., Meffre, S., ... & Matthews, K. J. (2016). Melanesian back-arc basin and arc development: Constraints from the eastern Coral Sea. Gondwana Research, 39, 77-95.en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/20836
dc.description.abstractThe eastern Coral Sea is a poorly explored area at the north-eastern corner of the Australian Tectonic Plate, where interaction between the Pacific and Australian plate boundaries, and accretion of the world's largest submarine plateau – the Ontong Java Plateau – has resulted in a complex assemblage of back-arc basins, island arcs, continental plateaus and volcanic products. This study combines new and existing magnetic anomaly profiles, seafloor fabric from swath bathymetry data, Ar–Ar dating of E-MORB basalts, palaeontological dating of carbonate sediments, and plate modelling from the eastern Coral Sea. Our results constrain commencement of the opening of the Santa Cruz Basin and South Rennell Trough to c. 48 Ma and termination at 25–28 Ma. Simultaneous opening of the Melanesian Basin/Solomon Sea further north suggests that a single > 2000 km long back-arc basin, with at least one triple junction existed landward of the Melanesian subduction zone from Eocene–Oligocene times. The cessation of spreading corresponds with a reorganisation of the plate boundaries in the area and the proposed initial soft collision of the Ontong Java Plateau. The correlation between back-arc basin cessation and a widespread plate reorganisation event suggests that back-arc basins may be used as markers for both local and global plate boundary changes.en_AU
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank the Captain and crew of R/V Southern Surveyor and Australia's Marine National Facility (MNF) for the success of voyage SS2012_V06. Mineral separation was done by John Simes and Belinda Smith Lyttle. We thank Hugh Davies for his attempts to locate old Solomon Sea dredge samples and Geoscience Australia and New Caledonia agencies for voyage support. We acknowledge funding from the Australian Research Council through grants DP0987713 and FT130101564 (MS), FL0992245 (SEW), IH130200012 (SZ) and DP130101946 (KJM). Support from the New Zealand Government through core funding to GNS Science (NM) is also acknowledged. We thank Robert Holm and an anonymous reviewer for their comments, which improved the quality of the manuscript.en_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.publisherGondwana Researchen_AU
dc.relationAustralian Research Council through grants DP0987713 and FT130101564 (MS), FL0992245 (SEW), IH130200012 (SZ) and DP130101946 (KJM).en_AU
dc.subjectEastern Coral Sea Melanesia SW PacificBack-arc basin Subductionen_AU
dc.titleMelanesian back-arc basin and arc development: Constraints from the eastern Coral Seaen_AU
dc.typeArticleen_AU
dc.subject.asrc040313en_AU
dc.subject.asrc040402en_AU
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.gr.2016.06.011
dc.type.pubtypePost-printen_AU


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