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dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Sally
dc.contributor.authorLo, Steson
dc.contributor.authorXia, Violet
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-14
dc.date.available2019-02-14
dc.date.issued2017-05-01
dc.identifier.citationAndrews, S., Lo, S., & Xia, V. (2017). Individual differences in automatic semantic priming. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 43, 1025-1039. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xhp0000372en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/20000
dc.description.abstractThis research investigated whether automatic semantic priming is modulated by individual differences in lexical proficiency. A sample of 89 skilled readers, assessed on reading comprehension, vocabulary and spelling ability, were tested in a semantic categorisation task that required classification of words as animals or non-animals. Target words were preceded by brief (50 ms) masked semantic primes that were either congruent or incongruent with the category of the target. Congruent primes were also selected to be either high (e.g., hawk EAGLE, pistol RIFLE) or low (e.g., mole EAGLE, boots RIFLE) in feature overlap with the target. ‘Overall proficiency’, indexed by high performance on both a ‘semantic composite’ measure of reading comprehension and vocabulary and a ‘spelling composite’, predicted stronger congruence priming from both high and low feature overlap primes for animal exemplars, but only predicted priming from low overlap primes for non-exemplars. Classification of high frequency non-exemplars was also significantly modulated by an independent ‘spelling-meaning’ factor, indexed by differences between the semantic and spelling composites, which appeared to tap sensitivity to semantic relative to orthographic feature overlap between the prime and target. These findings show that higher lexical proficiency predicts stronger automatic semantic priming and suggest that individual differences in lexical quality modulate the division of labor between orthographic and semantic processing in early lexical retrieval.en_AU
dc.description.sponsorshipAustralian Research Councilen_AU
dc.language.isoen_USen_AU
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_AU
dc.relationARC DP160103224en_AU
dc.rights©American Psychological Association, 2017. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. The final article is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xhp0000372en_AU
dc.subjectReadingen_AU
dc.subjectSemantic primingen_AU
dc.subjectLexical processingen_AU
dc.subjectReading abilityen_AU
dc.titleIndividual differences in automatic semantic primingen_AU
dc.typeArticleen_AU
dc.subject.asrcFoR::170112 - Sensory Processes, Perception and Performanceen_AU
dc.subject.asrcFoR::170204 - Linguistic Processes (incl. Speech Production and Comprehension)en_AU
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/xhp0000372
dc.type.pubtypePost-printen_AU


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