Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWenham, Deborah
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-30T02:10:00Z
dc.date.available2010-07-30T02:10:00Z
dc.date.issued1993
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/6379
dc.descriptionThis work was digitised and made available on open access by Yooroang Garang, the School of Indigenous Health Studies; the University of Sydney; and Sydney eScholarship. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. Where possible, the School will try to notify the author of this work. If you have any inquiries or issues regarding this work being made available please contact the Sydney eScholarship Repository Coordinator - escholarship.info@sydney.edu.auen_AU
dc.description.abstractAustralian studies have indicated that NESB mentally ill live with and are cared for by their families to a much greater degree than the ESB host community. The possibilities for interaction between migration stressors and the stressors associated with caring for a mentally ill person, have health and quality of life implications for NESB carers and mentally ill. So far the experiences of NESB carers have received little research. This study is a qualitative evaluation of the experiences of four Portuguese families caring for a person with a chronic psychotic illness. In depth interviews of both carers and Health workers working with Portuguese carers and clients were used to reveal aspects of carer experience such as Migration, Leisure, and Knowledge of Mental illness. The study concluded that the Portuguese carers and mentally ill have been successful migrants who have achieved what they came here to do. The Portuguese women were found to be the major providers of care to the mentally ill and their experiences appear to parallel those of other NESB and ESB carers of the mentally ill or other chronically ill or disabled persons. For two carers however the personal cost of caring was very high. The negativity of their experience can be directly attributed to the cultural factors of male alcoholism and domestic violence which appear to be endemic in Portuguese communities. The client directed orientation of mental health servicing whereby the expertise and/or the difficulties of carers and their children are not assessed or incorporated in care planning was also found to contribute directly to carer burden.en_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis
dc.subjectnon-English speakingen_AU
dc.subjectcaregiversen_AU
dc.subjectmental illnessen_AU
dc.subjectmental disordersen_AU
dc.subjectquality of lifeen_AU
dc.subjectcommunication barriersen_AU
dc.subjectmigrationen_AU
dc.subjectimmigrationen_AU
dc.subjectemigrationen_AU
dc.titleChronic mental illness and its effects on the Portuguese familyen_AU
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_AU
dc.contributor.departmentBehavioural & Social Sciences in Healthen_AU


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record