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dc.contributor.authorFreeman, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-30T02:05:46Z
dc.date.available2010-07-30T02:05:46Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/6352
dc.descriptionThis work was digitised and made available on open access by Yooroang Garang, the School of Indigenous Health Studies; the University of Sydney; and Sydney eScholarship. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. Where possible, the School will try to notify the author of this work. If you have any inquiries or issues regarding this work being made available please contact the Sydney eScholarship Repository Coordinator - escholarship.info@sydney.edu.auen_AU
dc.description.abstractFemale Genital Mutilation (FGM) is a procedure involving partial or total removal of genitalia for cultural or non-therapeutic purposes. It is practiced for economic, traditional and religious reasons in different countries around the globe. What policies and legislation have been used to prevent the practice and how Australia deals with it is among some of her migrant population is the purpose of this study. The study shows that the practice of FGM in other countries must be viewed with caution, within the context of social, economic and traditional structures of these societies. Faced with the dilemma of one's right against the horm of the tradition, western societies has now embarked on preventative measures through education and changes in behaviour.en_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis
dc.subjectFemale genital mutilationen_AU
dc.subjectfemale circumcisionen_AU
dc.subjectclitoridectomyen_AU
dc.titleFemale genital mutilationen_AU
dc.typeThesisen_AU
dc.contributor.departmentBehavioural & Social Sciences in Healthen_AU


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