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dc.contributor.authorWinsor-Dahlstrom, Josephine
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-15T23:41:22Z
dc.date.available2009-11-15T23:41:22Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/5708
dc.descriptionAboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are advised that this material may contain references to or images of people who have died.en
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this project is to explore the role of the Aboriginal Health Worker, their recognition as a legitimate profession and the current racism most will face in the current New South Wales Health System. The position of the Aboriginal Health Worker was introduced to improve the consultation process with Aboriginal people about their health. It was also introduced to address their specific cultural needs around health. Anecdotal reports from the field by various Aboriginal Health Workers show that these objectives have, in large, not been met. A preliminary review into the literature was conducted which includes important discussions and studies into the history and development of the Aboriginal Health Worker role. This review is not placed in a single chapter, but is strategically placed throughout the thesis to demonstrate the impact of this development and history upon the different issues of role, recognition, racism and horizontal violence. This project uses a qualitative approach using a descriptive study design. A sample of five selected participants of who were all ex-Aboriginal Health Workers joined the research project. The qualitative method of theme extraction was employed for data analysis which led to the emergence of themes which were grouped and compared to each other. The findings were contrasted with relevant literature in the field to fully understand the phenomenon under study and explore why objectives regarding Aboriginal Health Workers continue not to be met, despite Health Service Management rhetoric. The five ex-Aboriginal Health Workers were interviewed, in-depth, to provide information on the recognition, role and racism difficulties they faced at work. They were selected from five different Area Health Services so that the sample remains relatively heterogeneous. This ensures a record experiences from as wide a variety of work environments as possible in the sample. The interviews reveal a deep sense of shame and hurt experienced by the Aboriginal Health Workers caused by both their communities and their employers. The paper presents the story of the despair experienced by those interviewed and shows examples of promised recommendations to facilitate the future recognition and contribution of the Aboriginal Health Worker. Limitations of the methodology and implications for further study are also discussed.en
dc.language.isoen_AUen
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this work.en
dc.subjecthealth workforceen
dc.subjecthorizontal violenceen
dc.subjectracismen
dc.subjectdiscriminationen
dc.subjectbullyingen
dc.subjectIndigenousen
dc.subjectAboriginalen
dc.titleAboriginal health workers: Role, recognition, racism and horizontal violence in the workplaceen
dc.typeThesis, Honoursen
dc.contributor.departmentIndigenous Heath Studiesen


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