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dc.contributor.authorPereira, Ryan
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-26
dc.date.available2020-08-26
dc.date.submitted2020-01-01en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2123/23172
dc.description.abstractThe surgical specialty of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary (HPB) surgery was pioneered in the early 1950s and stems from the specialty of General and Gastrointestinal surgery.1Since its establishment, the specialty has enforced its role in managing both benign and malignant conditions of the liver, pancreas and biliary systems. As with many other specialties, there has been rapid growth in surgical technology, available imaging and operative equipment, with particular focus on minimally invasive methods for the patient over the past three decades. The research described in this Master of Surgery Thesis is presented as three sub-projects. The concepts of these studies were developed in response to three clinical situations I faced as a resident working in a high volume tertiary HPB Surgical Unit. Furthermore, when faced with each of these challenging clinical scenarios, I found it difficult to obtain clear, succinct and clinically relevant information to guide an evidence-based approach to patient care. Following extensive discussion with my surgical mentors, we formulated three research topics with a clear research plan to better guide others who may be faced with a similar scenario.en_AU
dc.language.isoenen_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydneyen_AU
dc.subjectleft sided gallbladderen_AU
dc.subjectgrooveen_AU
dc.subjectidiopathicen_AU
dc.subjectpancreatitisen_AU
dc.titleInvestigative Modalities and Management of Rare Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary (HPB) Surgical Conditionsen_AU
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.disclaimerAccess is restricted to staff and students of the University of Sydney . UniKey credentials are required. Non university access may be obtained by visiting the University of Sydney Library.en_AU
dc.type.thesisMasters by Researchen_AU
dc.rights.otherThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
usyd.facultySeS faculties schools::Faculty of Medicine and Health::Sydney Medical Schoolen_AU
usyd.departmentDiscipline of Surgeryen_AU
usyd.degreeMaster of Surgery M.S.en_AU
usyd.awardinginstThe University of Sydneyen_AU
usyd.advisorEslick, Guy


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