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dc.contributor.authorHillis, GS
dc.contributor.authorHata, J
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, M
dc.contributor.authorPerkovic, V
dc.contributor.authorArima, H
dc.contributor.authorChow, CK
dc.contributor.authorZoungas, S
dc.contributor.authorPatel, A
dc.contributor.authorPoulter, NR
dc.contributor.authorMancia, G
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, B
dc.contributor.authorChalmers, J
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-18T00:13:00Z
dc.date.available2019-12-18T00:13:00Z
dc.date.issued2012-09-26
dc.identifier.citationHillis GS, Hata J, Woodward M, et al. Resting Heart Rate and the Risk of Microvascular Complications in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Journal of the American Heart Association. 2012;1(5). doi:10.1161/jaha.112.002832en_AU
dc.identifier.issn10.1161/JAHA.112.002832
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2123/21547
dc.description.abstractBackground: A higher resting heart rate is associated with an increased probability of cardiovascular complications and premature death in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The impact of heart rate on the risk of developing microvascular complications, such as diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, is, however, unknown. The present study tests the hypothesis that a higher resting heart rate is associated with an increased incidence and a greater progression of microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods and Results: The relation between baseline resting heart rate and the development of a major microvascular event was examined in 11 140 patients who participated in the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Modified Release Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) study. Major microvascular events were defined as a composite of new or worsening nephropathy or new or worsening retinopathy. Patients with a higher baseline heart rate were at increased risk of a new major microvascular complication during follow‐up (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.13 per 10 beats per minute; 95% confidence interval: 1.07–1.20; P<0.001). The excess hazard was evident for both nephropathy (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.16 per 10 beats per minute; 95% confidence interval: 1.08–1.25) and retinopathy (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.11 per 10 beats per minute; 95% confidence interval: 1.02–1.21). Conclusion: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who have a higher resting heart rate experience a greater incidence of new‐onset or progressive nephropathy and retinopathy.en_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.publisherWiley Open Accessen_AU
dc.relationNHMRC GNT0571281en_AU
dc.rights© 2012 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley‐Blackwell. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.en_AU
dc.titleResting Heart Rate and the Risk of Microvascular Complications in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitusen_AU
dc.typeArticleen_AU
dc.type.pubtypePublisher versionen_AU


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