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dc.contributor.authorHarris, Michael Samuel
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-12
dc.date.available2019-09-12
dc.date.issued2019-02-28
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/21112
dc.description.abstractThis research examines the motives and outcomes of competitively positioned mixed-use megaprojects on government land. This type of project has been increasingly occurring around the world over the past few decades, motivated by four global processes: city-based international competition; the mobility and growth of knowledge economies; the redirection of global investment from physical to human capital; and the dominance of market-rule ideology and politics. The literature review and thematic content analysis determines the definition of a project sub-type within large development projects, termed Competitive Precinct Projects (CPPs) and reveals remarkable global consistency in evaluative themes, termed the five globally consistent criticisms of CPPs. These themes are tested through the case study of four examples occurring in two countries over a period of three decades: Ørestad and North Harbour in Copenhagen, Melbourne Docklands and Sydney’s Barangaroo. While the Consistent Criticisms represent patterns that have endured within a globally active urban development type for over three decades, this research shows that rather than being a neoliberal hegemony, there are mixed political and ideological aims and outcomes across projects and at times within the same project. A typological understanding allows patterns to be examined and understood, variances and hybridity to be evaluated, and more sophisticated future directions mapped out. Four factors are identified as driving differences in outcomes: government versus property industry leadership; degree of strategic coordination; public benefit expectations; and urban design frameworks and local knowledge. Five key themes are outlined providing a potential urban design framework for CPPs, if the Consistent Criticisms are to be avoided and these projects are to achieve broader based city-scale benefits: government leadership; strategic city structure; reconciling global and local goals; authenticity; and learning.en_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydneyen_AU
dc.publisherSydney School of Architecture, Design and Planningen_AU
dc.publisherUrban and Regional Planning and Policyen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
dc.subjectMegaprojectsen_AU
dc.subjectOrestaden_AU
dc.subjectNorth Harbouren_AU
dc.subjectMelbourne Docklandsen_AU
dc.subjectBaragarooen_AU
dc.subjectCompetitive citiesen_AU
dc.titleCompetitive Precinct Projects: An evaluation of competitively positioned mixed-use megaprojectsen_AU
dc.typePhD Doctorateen_AU
dc.type.pubtypeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU
dc.description.disclaimerAccess is restricted to staff and students of the University of Sydney . UniKey credentials are required. Non university access may be obtained by visiting the University of Sydney Library.en_AU


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