Show simple item record

FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCartwright, Madison Karl
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-22
dc.date.available2019-01-22
dc.date.issued2018-07-27
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/19835
dc.description.abstractIntellectual property, including copyright specifically, has been a cornerstone of the United States’ (US) international trade policy over the past three decades at the bilateral, regional and multilateral level. Meanwhile, the past three decades has also been a period of intense disruption of copyright law due to the emergence of new technology. This includes home-taping devices, the internet and online file-sharing services. In response, the US’s domestic laws on copyright have also changed dramatically during this time. Applying a historical institutionalist analysis, this thesis examines how processes of domestic institutional change on copyright influenced, and were influenced, by the US’s international trade agenda. In particular, it analyses how the emergence of new technology changes the balance of power between local commercial interests and their preferences, and the impact this has on state preferences in international negotiations. However, the thesis does not limit its analysis to copyright owning interests such as film studios and software publishers. It also includes the commercial interests behind these new technologies themselves. Additionally, the thesis does not accept that the discursive strategies of these interests were pivotal in making copyright a major trade priority, or that they determine state preferences through institutional capture of the US’s trade negotiator’s office. Instead, the thesis argues that it is the confluence of commercial interests and state interests, particular on economic nationalist and security grounds, which has determined the international negotiating agenda of the US. As a result, the US international copyright standard setting efforts have been determined by a combination of the state’s economic nationalist and security interests, and how these align with those of local commercial constituents. US preferences have thus evolved with changes in these state and commercial interests due to new technology, and shifting power asymmetries in the international political economy. This approach is referred to as ‘embedded nationalism’.en_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydneyen_AU
dc.publisherThe Faculty of Arts and Social Sciencesen_AU
dc.publisherSchool of Social and Political Sciencesen_AU
dc.publisherDepartment of Government and International Relationsen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
dc.subjectEconomic nationalismen_AU
dc.subjectHistorical institutionalismen_AU
dc.subjectCopyrighten_AU
dc.subjectInternational lawen_AU
dc.subjectInternational tradeen_AU
dc.titleState, market, and corporate power in the international political economy: The case of copyright standard setting by the united states, 1980 to todayen_AU
dc.typePhD Doctorateen_AU
dc.type.pubtypeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU
dc.description.disclaimerAccess is restricted to staff and students of the University of Sydney . UniKey credentials are required. Non university access may be obtained by visiting the University of Sydney Library.en_AU


Show simple item record

Associated file/s

Associated collections

Show simple item record

There are no previous versions of the item available.