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dc.contributor.authorRavindran, Subahari
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-11T06:04:31Z
dc.date.available2016-01-11T06:04:31Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/14210
dc.descriptionBackground: The low participation rate of Indigenous people in disability services are attributed to the lack of culturally appropriate services. For culturally appropriate disability services provision, understanding how Indigenous people and the disability services sector conceptualise disability is essential. This study aimed to critically compare the conceptualisation of disability between Indigenous people and New South Wales government and non-government disability service agencies. Methods: Purposive and snowball sampling was performed to obtain Indigenous and Policy sources. The Indigenous conceptualisation of disability by Indigenous spokespeople in journal, magazine and newspaper articles, books, speeches and audiovisual materials were included. New South Wales government disability service agency: Ageing, Disability and Home Care and seven non-government disability agencies conceptualising disability in annual reports, plans and program guidelines were included. The Occupational Justice Framework guided critical analysis of Indigenous and policy materials at the Cultural Interface. Results: Four themes: Power and self-determination, Eligibility, Otherness and Identity and labels were identified. Disability agencies promote self-determination for Indigenous people. Agencies conceptualise disability as impairments affecting functioning, when assessing eligibility for service access. Most Indigenous people do not self-identify as disabled and are categorised as culturally different in policies. Thus Indigenous people experience marginalisation due to their cultural identity. Conclusion: Indigenous people are required to conform to the Western conceptualisations of disability. Agencies must collaborate with Indigenous communities to address the individual community needs by recognising the diverse Indigenous conceptualisations of disability.en_AU
dc.description.abstractThis thesis critically compares the conceptualisation of disability in the public discourse between Indigenous people and New South Wales (NSW) government and non-government disability service agencies. This study explores intersections of the conceptualisations of disability at the Cultural Interface using the Occupational Justice Framework (Gilroy, 2009; Durocher, Gibson and Rappolt, 2014). This thesis consists of two sections. Section 1: Literature Review Section 2: Journal manuscript The first section of this thesis is the literature review. The literature review examines the low participation rate of indigenous people in disability services and the need for culturally appropriate disability services for Indigenous people. In order to ensure culturally appropriate services are provided for Indigenous people, the Western and Indigenous perspectives of disability need to be understood and each are discussed in turn in the literature review. The review initially discusses the Western conceptualisation of disability, followed by the Indigenous conceptualisation of disability. The review also explores how both Indigenous and Western perspectives on disability influence each other. The developments in disability conceptualisation throughout history are also discussed, followed by the current literature that led to the development of this study. The second section of this thesis is a journal manuscript. The journal manuscript explores the intersections and tensions between Indigenous people and NSW government and non- government disability service agencies regarding the conceptualisation of disability. The journal manuscript also examines the outcomes and implications of the findings.en_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.subjectAboriginal and Torres Strait Islanderen_AU
dc.subjectOccupational justiceen_AU
dc.subjectCultural Interfaceen_AU
dc.subjectGovernment policyen_AU
dc.subjectService deliveryen_AU
dc.titleA critical comparison of the similarities and differences in the conceptualisation of disability between Indigenous people in Australia and New South Wales disability service agenciesen_AU
dc.typeThesisen_AU
dc.contributor.departmentDiscipline of Occupational Therapyen_AU


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