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dc.contributor.authorMooney-Somers, Julie
dc.contributor.authorMicallef, J
dc.contributor.authorBateson, D
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, C
dc.contributor.authorVan Gemert, C
dc.contributor.authorLewis, L
dc.contributor.authorKaldor, J
dc.contributor.authorGuy, R
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-23
dc.date.available2014-09-23
dc.date.issued2013-01-01
dc.identifier.citationMooney-Somers J, Micallef J, Bateson D, Harvey C, Van Gemert C, Lewis L, Kaldor J, Guy R (2013) Patient delivered partner therapy for chlamydia: Support and concern among doctors and nurses working in Australian Family Planning clinics. Sexual Health, Darwin. Posteren_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/11976
dc.descriptionconference posteren_AU
dc.description.abstractPatient delivered partner therapy (PDPT) is the practice of providing a prescription or medication to a patient diagnosed with an STI to give to their partner without that partner being assessed by a clinician. International studies have shown PDPT increases partner treatment and reduces reinfection rates (Trelle, 2007). The Northern Territory remains the only Australian jurisdiction to have enacted legislation to support PDPT; in other jurisdictions it is illegal or its status is unclear. However, advocacy for PDPT is increasing in Australia. The Royal Australasian College of Physicians Australasian Chapter of Sexual Health Medicine called for PDPT for chlamydia in 2011. More recently, Huffman, et al. (2003) made a case for legislative support. They argued its legal status was the only barrier to implementation. AIM: To understand Australian Family Planning clinicians’ practices and perceptions of patient delivered partner therapy CONCLUSION: Family Planning clinicians saw PDPT as a viable and useful clinical option for delivering the best care for their patients and effective chlamydia management for the community. While some concerns remain we did not find the general negative attitude previously reported (eg Pavlin, et al., 2010). This suggests acceptability may have increased. Remaining concerns may be addressed through careful work to articulate clear clinical guidelines and a legislative framework.en_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.titlePatient delivered partner therapy for chlamydia: Support and concern among doctors and nurses working in Australian Family Planning clinicsen_AU
dc.typeConference posteren_AU
dc.type.pubtypePublisher versionen_AU


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