Sydney Health Ethics is a centre for academic research, for teaching and learning in bioethics and the medical humanities, and for ethical consultation and discussion. We aim to stimulate creative thought, dialogue and action. Our work engages different disciplinary perspectives and fosters a community based on collegiality and critical inquiry. More

Sub-collections in this collection

Recent Submissions

  • Balancing Bioethics by Sensing the Aesthetic 

    Macneill, Paul
    Published 2017
    This paper is critical of ‘bioethics’ as it is widely understood and taught, noting in particular an emphasis given to philosophical justification, reason and rationality. It is proposed that ‘balancing’ bioethics be ...
    Open Access
    Article
  • An ethical critique of person-centred healthcare 

    Arnold, M; Kerridge, I; Lipworth, W
    Published 2020
    This paper explores the counterfactual aspects of Person-Centred Healthcare (PCH). PCH as promoted appears to have self-evident value as an expression of humanism in medical care, but this can be deceptive. Despite its ...
    Open Access
    Article
  • Lead Essay: Conflicts of interest: opening up new territories 

    Wiersma, Miriam; Lipworth, W; Komesaroff, Paul; Kerridge, I
    Published 2020
    Over the last few decades, awareness of the importance of managing conflicts of interest among health-related policymaking, professional, research, and clinical institutions has greatly increased. The visibility of the ...
    Open Access
    Conference paper
  • A framework for ethics review of applications to store, reuse and share tissue samples 

    Then, Shih-Ning; Lipworth, W; Stewart, Cameron; Kerridge, I
    Published 2021
    The practice of biobank networking—where biobanks are linked together, and researchers share human tissue samples—is an increasingly common practice both domestically and internationally. The benefits from networking in ...
    Embargoed
    Article
  • Beyond duty: Medical “heroes” and the Covid-19 pandemic 

    Lipworth, W
    Published 2020
    When infectious disease outbreaks strike, health facilities acquire labels such as “war zones” and “battlefields” and healthcare professionals become “heroes” on the “front line.” But unlike soldiers, healthcare professionals ...
    Open Access
    Article

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