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dc.contributor.authorLewis, P
dc.contributor.authorMooney-Somers, Julie
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-23
dc.date.available2014-09-23
dc.date.issued2014-07-01
dc.identifier.citationLewis, P & Mooney-Somers, J. Becoming a survivor – young people disclosing cancer to new acquaintances and romantic partners. 8th International conference on teenage and young adult cancer medicine, London July 2014 (poster)en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/11973
dc.descriptionconference posteren_AU
dc.description.abstractCancer can be stigmatising for young people, especially when the physical markers of illness and treatment, suchas scarring and baldness, are visible to others. Visible physical markers can draw unwanted attention. However, after these physical markers fade, young people still fear being stigmatised because they remain atrisk of having their socially undesirable cancer history exposed to the scrutiny of others. Young people must choose who to tell about their cancer history and when and how they will make their disclosure. As disclosure appears to generally go well, some young people who are early in their period of cancer survival might benefit from opportunities to explore disclosure strategies with more experienced survivor peers. Little is known about how young people choose to disclose their cancer history, the timing and methods of their disclosures and what the likely consequences of disclosure are for them as individuals and for the relationships that they seek to develop.en_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.publisherVELiMen_AU
dc.titleBecoming a survivor – young people disclosing cancer to new acquaintances and romantic partnersen_AU
dc.typeConference posteren_AU
dc.type.pubtypePublisher versionen_AU


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