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dc.contributor.authorMooney-Somers, Julie
dc.contributor.authorErick, W
dc.contributor.authorScott, R
dc.contributor.authorAkee, A
dc.contributor.authorKaldor, J
dc.contributor.authorMaher, L
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-22
dc.date.available2014-09-22
dc.date.issued2009-01-01
dc.identifier.citationMooney-Somers, J, Erick, W, Scott, R, Akee, A, Kaldor, J, & Maher, L (2009) Enhancing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people’s resilience to blood borne and sexually transmitted infections: Findings from a community-based participatory research project. Health Promotion Journal of Australia, 20(3):195-201.en_AU
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/11953
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.publish.csiro.au/?paper=HE09195
dc.description.abstractIssue addressed: Health services are fundamental to reducing the burden of blood-borne and sexually transmitted infections (BBV/STI) in Indigenous communities. However, we know very little about young Indigenous people’s use of mainstream and community-controlled health services for the prevention and treatment of these infections, or how health services can best support young people’s efforts to prevent infection. Methods: University-researchers, a site coordinator and peer researchers developed a project and conducted interviews with 45 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 17 to 26 years. Thematic analysis of interviews notes identified key themes around health service use and experiences of Aboriginal Community-Controlled Health Services (ACCHS). Results: Most participants had accessed health services for the prevention or treatment of BBV/STI, with positive experiences characterised by the provision of information and feeling cared for. Participants described the comfort and understanding they experienced at ACCHS; personal relationships and having an Indigenous care provider present were important factors in the overwhelmingly positive accounts. Young people reported strategies for overcoming challenges to prevention and accessing treatment services, including being proactive by carrying condoms, persisting with behavioural intentions despite feeling shame. . Conclusion: Our findings reinforce the important role both mainstream and community-controlled health services have in the prevention and treatment of BBV/STI blood borne and sexually transmitted infections in young Indigenous people. We highlight opportunities to build on young people’s strengths, such as their valuing of their health, their persistence, and their offers to support peers, to better prevent transmission of infections and enhance access to treatment.en_AU
dc.description.sponsorshipthe International Collaboration in Indigenous Health Research Program, a trilateral partnership between the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and the Health Research Council of New Zealanden_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.publisherCSIROen_AU
dc.relationfunded by the International Collaboration in Indigenous Health Research Program, a trilateral partnership between the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and the Health Research Council of New Zealanden_AU
dc.titleEnhancing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people’s resilience to blood borne and sexually transmitted infections: Findings from a community-based participatory research projecten_AU
dc.typeArticleen_AU
dc.type.pubtypePost-printen_AU


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