Show simple item record

FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDa, Wei Wei
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-24
dc.date.available2013-10-24
dc.date.issued2001-01-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/9456
dc.description.abstractSince the late 1970s, dramatic social changes in the People's Republic of China have led to a sudden emigration of Chinese from China to Australia. Given the obvious social and cultural differences between the two societies, what has been the impact of this cross-country migration upon the migrants' family lives in their new country of residence? How do they cope with the changing social context? Are there patterns within their family practices which are distinctive from those of the mainstream society? This study has examined family practices through in-depth interviews of 40 Chinese migrants who immigrated to Australia in the past two decades. The study is intended to be broadly contextualized and historical in scope. Hence, overviews of family traditions, culture and contemporary changes in both the home and host countries are elaborated. An analysis of the informants' motivations for migration and perceptions of the host society are also examined in significant detail, as the respondents' motivations and perceptions have implications for the ways they have chosen to reorganize their lives in a new country. Family life including marriage, attitudes towards sexuality, child rearing and the division of labour at home were probed among this sample within broad frameworks utilizing scholarly perspectives of immigration, ethnoculture and gender relations.
dc.language.isoenen_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydneyen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this materialen
dc.subjectChinese -- Australiaen_AU
dc.subjectFamilies -- Australia -- Cross-cultural studiesen_AU
dc.subjectAustralia -- Emigration and immigration -- Social aspectsen_AU
dc.subjectChina -- Emigration and immigrationen_AU
dc.titleMigrants from the People's Republic of China to Australia : a study of family practicesen_AU
dc.typePhD Doctorateen_AU
dc.contributor.departmentFaculty of Education, School of Social, Policy and Curriculum Studiesen_AU
dc.description.disclaimerThis thesis was digitised for the purposes of Document Delivery. It has been made available on open access by Sydney eScholarship and may only be used for the purposes of research and study. If you have any inquiries or issues regarding this work being made available please contact the Sydney eScholarship Repository Coordinator - escholarship.info@sydney.edu.auen_AU


Show simple item record

Associated file/s

Associated collections

Show simple item record

There are no previous versions of the item available.