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dc.contributor.authorOttensooser, Avner B.
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-14
dc.date.available2012-02-14
dc.date.issued2012-02-14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/8120
dc.description.abstractWe present and assess the novel thesis that a language commonly accepted for requirement elicitation is worth using for configuration of business process automation systems. We suggest that Cockburn's well accepted requirements elicitation language - the written use case language, with a few extensions, ought to be used as a workflow modelling language. We evaluate our thesis by studying in detail an industrial implementation of a workflow engine whose workflow modelling language is our extended written use case language; by surveying the variety of business processes that can be expressed by our extended written use case language; and by empirically assessing the readability of our extended written use case language. Our contribution is sixfold: (i) an architecture with which a workflow engine whose workflow modelling language is an extended written use case language can be built, configured, used and monitored; (ii) a detailed study of an industrial implementation of use case oriented workflow engine; (iii) assessment of the expressive power of the extended written use case language which is based on a known pattern catalogue; (iv) another assessments of the expressive power of the extended written use case language which is based on an equivalence to a formal model that is known to be expressive; (v) an empirical evaluation in industrial context of the readability of our extended written use case language in comparison to the readability of the incumbent graphical languages; and (vi) reflections upon the state of the art, methodologies, our results, and opportunities for further research. Our conclusions are that a workflow engine whose workflow modelling language is an extended written use case language can be built, configured, used and monitored; that in an environment that calls upon an extended written use case language as a workflow modelling language, the transition between the modelling and verification state, enactment state, and monitoring state is dynamic; that a use case oriented workflow engine was implemented in industrial settings and that the approach was well accepted by management, workflow configuration officers and workflow participants alike; that the extended written use case language is quite expressive, as much as the incumbent graphical languages; and that in industrial context an extended written use case language is an efficient communication device amongst stakeholders.en_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis.
dc.rights.urihttp://www.library.usyd.edu.au/copyright.html
dc.subjectwork flow, workflow, BPM, BPMN, use-case, Cockburnen_AU
dc.subjectworkflowen_AU
dc.titleDynamic Workflow-Engineen_AU
dc.typeThesisen_AU
dc.date.valid2011-01-01en_AU
dc.type.thesisDoctor of Philosophyen_AU
usyd.facultyFaculty of Engineering and Information Technologiesen_AU
usyd.degreeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU
usyd.awardinginstThe University of Sydneyen_AU


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