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dc.contributor.authorDuncanson, Kirsty
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, Nesam
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-17T06:08:33Z
dc.date.available2011-05-17T06:08:33Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-17
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-74210-224-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/7379
dc.description.abstractFilm is a significant medium through which Western audiences learn about crime and suffering occurring beyond their national borders. On this basis, this article critically reflects on the ‘knowledge’ of criminal violence in contemporary Africa provided by two recent films, Blood Diamond (2006) and Sometimes in April (2005). We argue that the films offer notably divergent understandings of the nature of violent conflict in post-colonial Africa, and of who is capable of bearing the responsibility to address its causes and legacy. While Blood Diamond adopts a conventional colonial narrative in which Africa, through the example of Sierra Leone, is portrayed as a place of disorder ultimately requiring the intervention of the West, Sometimes in April offers an alternative image of a more autonomous African nation, able to actively negotiate the challenges of the post-conflict and post-colonial environment.en_AU
dc.description.sponsorshipSydney Institute of Criminology; School of Social Sciences at the University of Western Sydneyen_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.publisherSydney Institute of Criminologyen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofseriesANZCCC2010en_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this work.en_AU
dc.subjectfilmen_AU
dc.subjectAfricaen_AU
dc.subjectcritical criminologyen_AU
dc.title‘This is Africa’: Filmic Negotiations of Crime, Justice and Global Responsibilityen_AU
dc.typeConference paperen_AU
dc.contributor.departmentSydney Institute of Criminologyen_AU


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