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dc.contributor.authorSalter, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-17T06:05:47Z
dc.date.available2011-05-17T06:05:47Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-17
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-74210-224-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/7372
dc.description.abstractThis paper will discuss the relationship between sexual abuse, invalidation and testimonial legitimacy with a particular focus on organised abuse. Using qualitative data drawn from a study of adult survivors of organised abuse, the paper emphasises how strategies of invalidation, disbelief and minimisation are embedded in children’s experiences of organised abuse as well as in the response of others to organised abuse throughout their lifespan. This analysis troubles the distinction between everyday and legalistic notions of credibility and emphasises instead how the denial of testimonial legitimacy to children and women in a range of contexts is underpinned by relations of power that compound the gendered risks and harms of sexual abuse. The findings of this study suggest that the denial of testimonial legitimacy is a serious barrier to the wellbeing and safety of victims of sexual abuse, such as those disclosing organised abuse, whose life histories render them particularly vulnerable to strategies of invalidation.en_AU
dc.description.sponsorshipSydney Institute of Criminology; School of Social Sciences at the University of Western Sydneyen_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.publisherSydney Institute of Criminologyen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofseriesANZCCC2010en_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this work.en_AU
dc.subjectorganised abuseen_AU
dc.subjecttestimonial legitimacyen_AU
dc.subjectcritical criminologyen_AU
dc.titleOrganised Abuse and Testimonial Legitimacyen_AU
dc.typeConference paperen_AU
dc.contributor.departmentSydney Institute of Criminologyen_AU


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