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dc.contributor.authorBeesley, Julie
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-17T06:00:09Z
dc.date.available2011-05-17T06:00:09Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-17
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-74210-224-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/7363
dc.description.abstractBorrowed theories and principles from the physical sciences have enabled social scientists and criminologists to analyse well-worn theories and data from a new perspective. One such theory is chaos theory, a subset of the family of complexity theory, and an emerging perspective in postmodern criminology. Chaos theory is the science of non-linear and dynamic systems that appear random due to their complex behaviour, but in essence are deterministic and sensitive to initial conditions (popularly referred to as the butterfly effect). Chaos theory is best applied to systems that operate at local and global level, and that display signs of both order and disorder. Organised crime may be described as such a system. This paper explores the notion and attempts to analyse organised crime from a new perspective.en_AU
dc.description.sponsorshipSydney Institute of Criminology; School of Social Sciences at the University of Western Sydneyen_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.publisherSydney Institute of Criminologyen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofseriesANZCCC2010en_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this work.en_AU
dc.subjectcritical criminologyen_AU
dc.subjectANZCCC2010en_AU
dc.subjectorganised crimeen_AU
dc.subjectchaos theoryen_AU
dc.titleOrganised Crime: A Chaotic Notionen_AU
dc.typeConference paperen_AU
dc.contributor.departmentSydney Institute of Criminologyen_AU


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