Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBalint, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Julie
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-17T05:58:10Z
dc.date.available2011-05-17T05:58:10Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-17
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-74210-224-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/7361
dc.description.abstractTransitional justice has become the dominant international framework for redressing mass harm and historical injustices. However, transitional justice is commonly premised on the notion of a recent point of rupture or change from violence and oppression to a ‘new dawn’, and has therefore been less attuned to accommodating the long-term effects of colonialism. Accordingly, the historical experiences of Indigenous peoples in settler states such as Australia, New Zealand and North America have been considered outside the field. This exploratory paper sketches out some of the perceived benefits of articulating a new conceptual approach, which at once historicises transitional justice and brings the experiences of Indigenous peoples within its purview. Taking an interdisciplinary (criminological, socio-legal and historical) perspective, we consider why notions of transitional justice have not been thought relevant to the circumstances of settler colonialism. We suggest that while the relatively presentist concerns of transitional justice effectively elide the impact of colonialism, its holistic ameliorative framework might nevertheless become relevant to considerations of how just outcomes might be pursued in settler societies. Similarly, in elaborating the significance of colonial pasts per se in shaping contemporary experiences, such interdisciplinary approaches might also help address some of the criticisms emerging in recent literature on transitional justice. We draw here on a larger team-based and cross-sectoral interdisciplinary research project that has been submitted for funding under the Australian Research Council Linkage scheme. It will be the task of the larger project to develop and explore the many issues arising from this discussion, including the need to identify and examine certain conceptual and applied challenges involved in seeking the kind of comprehensive official recognition of past injustices we simply canvass here.en_AU
dc.description.sponsorshipSydney Institute of Criminology; School of Social Sciences at the University of Western Sydneyen_AU
dc.language.isoen_AUen_AU
dc.publisherSydney Institute of Criminologyen_AU
dc.relation.ispartofseriesANZCCC2010en_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this work.en_AU
dc.subjectcritical criminologyen_AU
dc.subjecttransitional justiceen_AU
dc.subjectANZCCC2010en_AU
dc.titleThe Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference 2010 Proceedings: Transitional Justice and Settler Statesen_AU
dc.typeConference paperen_AU
dc.contributor.departmentSydney Institute of Criminologyen_AU


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record