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dc.contributor.authorSebastian, Eugene Francis
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-01
dc.date.available2010-02-01
dc.date.issued2009-06-16
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/5833
dc.descriptionDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_AU
dc.description.abstractThe thesis investigates the motivations behind, the methods used in, and the results of the overseas students’ collective action contesting the measures, which the Australian government introduced from 1983 to 1996. As a group of temporary residents located outside the boundaries of domestic political systems, yet within the core of Australia’s revenue earnings, overseas students independently mobilised in an attempt to influence the Australian Government policy on education from a position of limited political, social and legal rights. As temporary residents on short-term permits fully regulated under prescribed immigration rules, overseas students employed conventional repertoires of contention— they established formal structures, adopted action tools, framed their claims, internationalised their protest, formed alliances — in an attempt to mobilise resources and access existing avenues to influence government’s export of education services policy. Their mobilisation response and campaign strategy achieved modest success in securing some policy concessions, particularly during the early stages of education aid reform. Their strategy, however had to evolve as the fledgling export of education services expanded and eventually they shifted their position to fully embrace and reinterpret the government’s own ‘language of liberalisation’, which they used to greater effectiveness in making subsequent claims. Overseas students ability to procure concessions is derived not from their political or universal rights to education, but from their ability to influence policy changes based on their importance and strategic location in the Australian economy. In other words, government, universities and industry stakeholders have increasingly become dependent on substantial revenue earnings derived from overseas students and have become susceptible to potential chaos that may be precipitated if current students withdrew from the economy, or potential students choosing alternative education service destinations.en_AU
dc.publisherDiscipline of Government and International Relationsen_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydney.en_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis.
dc.rights.urihttp://www.library.usyd.edu.au/copyright.html
dc.subjectstudent protesten_AU
dc.subjectcollective actionen_AU
dc.subjectexport of education servicesen_AU
dc.subjecttemporary residentsen_AU
dc.subjectnon-citizens actionen_AU
dc.subjectoverseas studentsen_AU
dc.subjectinternational educationen_AU
dc.titlePROTEST FROM THE FRINGE: Overseas Students and their Influence on Australia’s Export of Education Services Policy 1983-1996en_AU
dc.typePhD Doctorateen_AU
dc.date.valid2010-01-01en_AU


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