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dc.contributor.authorSarkar, Somwrita
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-11
dc.date.available2009-11-11
dc.date.issued2009-11-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/5683
dc.descriptionDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_AU
dc.description.abstractThis thesis presents a computational method for the inductive inference of explicit and implicit semantic design knowledge from the symbolic-mathematical syntax of design formulations using an unsupervised pattern recognition and extraction approach. Existing research shows that AI / machine learning based design computation approaches either require high levels of knowledge engineering or large training databases to acquire problem reformulation knowledge. The method presented in this thesis addresses these methodological limitations. The thesis develops, tests, and evaluates ways in which the method may be employed for design problem reformulation. The method is based on the linear algebra based factorization method Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), dimensionality reduction and similarity measurement through unsupervised clustering. The method calculates linear approximations of the associative patterns of symbol cooccurrences in a design problem representation to infer induced coupling strengths between variables, constraints and system components. Unsupervised clustering of these approximations is used to identify useful reformulations. These two components of the method automate a range of reformulation tasks that have traditionally required different solution algorithms. Example reformulation tasks that it performs include selection of linked design variables, parameters and constraints, design decomposition, modularity and integrative systems analysis, heuristically aiding design “case” identification, topology modeling and layout planning. The relationship between the syntax of design representation and the encoded semantic meaning is an open design theory research question. Based on the results of the method, the thesis presents a set of theoretical postulates on computable relationships between design syntax and semantics. The postulates relate the performance of the method with empirical findings and theoretical insights provided by cognitive neuroscience and cognitive science on how the human mind engages in symbol processing and the resulting capacities inherent in symbolic representational systems to encode “meaning”. The performance of the method suggests that semantic “meaning” is a higher order, global phenomenon that lies distributed in the design representation in explicit and implicit ways. A one-to-one local mapping between a design symbol and its meaning, a largely prevalent approach adopted by many AI and learning algorithms, may not be sufficient to capture and represent this meaning. By changing the theoretical standpoint on how a “symbol” is defined in design representations, it was possible to use a simple set of mathematical ideas to perform unsupervised inductive inference of knowledge in a knowledge-lean and training-lean manner, for a knowledge domain that traditionally relies on “giving” the system complex design domain and task knowledge for performing the same set of tasks.en
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis.
dc.rights.urihttp://www.library.usyd.edu.au/copyright.html
dc.subjectDesign computation and optimizationen
dc.subjectSingular Value Decomposition and dimensionality reductionen
dc.subjectPattern extractionen
dc.subjectDesign reformulationen
dc.subjectSyntax and semantics in formal representational systemsen
dc.titleAcquiring symbolic design optimization problem reformulation knowledge: On computable relationships between design syntax and semanticsen
dc.typeThesisen_AU
dc.date.valid2009-01-01en
dc.type.thesisDoctor of Philosophyen_AU
usyd.facultyFaculty of Architecture, Design and Planningen_AU
usyd.departmentDesign Laben_AU
usyd.degreeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU
usyd.awardinginstThe University of Sydneyen_AU


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