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dc.contributor.authorHall, Ross Douglas
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-03
dc.date.available2008-09-03
dc.date.issued2008-09-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/2795
dc.descriptionMaster of Engineeringen
dc.description.abstractTurbulent propagating premixed flames are encountered in spark ignition engines, gas turbines, industrial burners, as well as in vented gas explosions. In all these applications, the flame fronts interact with complex solid boundaries which not only distort the flame structure but directly affect the propagation rate in ways that are not yet fully understood. This thesis aims to provide both a quantitative and qualitative understanding of the link between overpressure, flame front wrinkling and turbulence levels generated in the propagating medium. This is an issue of importance for the provision of improved sub-models for the burning rates of premixed flames. An experimental chamber was constructed where controlled premixed flames were ignited from rest to propagate past solid obstacles and/or baffle plates strategically positioned in the chamber. Laser Doppler Anemometry was used to measure the velocity field and turbulence fields while pressure transducers were used to obtain pressure-time traces. In addition to this Laser-Induced Fluorescence of the Hydroxyl radical is was to image the flame front as it consumes the unburnt fuel captured in the re-circulation zone behind the main obstruction. The thesis reports on the effects of various parameters such as the inclusion of grids and obstructions, blockage ratio, and repeated obstacles to explore possible correlations between the pressure and the flow-fields. Pressure, velocity and LIF images were correlated and analysed to prove the significance of grid location and number on overall turbulence intensity. Corresponding flow field parameters such as flame front wrinkling, peak overpressure and RMS all combine to conclusively demonstrate their interaction and influence to turbulence intensity. By progressively positioning more grids further downstream, consequent rises in the flow field parameters and the establishment of positive trends indicates the overall significance of kernel development and flow disturbances in relation to turbulence generation.en
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydney.en
dc.publisherSchool of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineeringen
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis.
dc.rights.urihttp://www.library.usyd.edu.au/copyright.html
dc.subjectPremixed Combustionen
dc.subjectLaser Diagnosticsen
dc.subjectTurbulenceen
dc.titleInfluence of Obstacle Location and Frequency on the Propagation of Premixed Flamesen
dc.typeMasters Thesisen
dc.date.valid2008-01-01en


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