Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMarett, Allan
dc.contributor.authorBarwick, Linda
dc.contributor.authorFord, Lysbeth
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-07T05:55:44Z
dc.date.available2019-05-07T05:55:44Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-01
dc.identifier.citationMandji, B., Moyle, A., Marett, A., Barwick, L., Ford, L., Bilbil, M., & Marett, A. (2016). Mandji’s wangga . Sydney: Sydney University Press.en_AU
dc.identifier.isbn9781743325308
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/20378
dc.description.abstractBilly Mandji was a prolific and popular Belyuen songman. Active from the 1960s to the 1980s, he travelled widely and was recorded in Kununurra, Timber Creek, Oenpelli and Beswick Creek as well as his home community of Belyuen (Delissaville). He was a prominent participant in the tourist corroborees presented by people from Belyuen in various locations around Darwin and the Cox Peninsula. In addition to composing songs of his own, Billy Mandji inherited songs in Emmi-Mendhe from the Emmiyangal people with whom he lived at Belyuen, and he also sang the Emmi-Mendhe songs of Jimmy Muluk (see Muluk’s Wangga), often in the role of backup singer. His own language, Marri Tjavin, appeared rarely in his songs, and many of Mandji’s songs are composed in untranslatable ‘ghost language’. Although Allan Marett recorded Mandji’s songs in 1988, he was never able to work with him on documenting his songs, so the translations and interpretations are the result of working with other speakers, especially his extremely knowledgeable ‘daughter’ (brother’s daughter), Marjorie Knuckey Bilbil.en_AU
dc.publisherSydney University Pressen_AU
dc.subjectIndigenous Australian musicen_AU
dc.subjectDaly River Regionen_AU
dc.titleMandji's Wanggaen_AU
dc.typeOtheren_AU


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record