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dc.contributor.authorCarcel, Cheryl
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-02
dc.date.available2019-10-02
dc.date.issued2019-04-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/21164
dc.description.abstractAn understanding of sex differences in terms of the risk of disease and its influence on therapeutic interventions can lead to improved disease recognition and treatment for women and men. The overall goal of this thesis was to identify gaps in knowledge in the reporting of sex differences in stroke by using a series of systematic approaches to examine the reporting of sex and gender differences more generally and in stroke. First, in order to determine whether funding agencies and peer-reviewed journals in Australia have policies on the collection, analysis and reporting of sex and gender-specific health data, I performed a qualitative survey utilising web-based searches and interviews. Then I narrowed the focus to stroke where I examined the temporal and regional trends in female participation and the reporting of sex differences in randomised controlled trials identified from ClinicalTrials.gov. Finally, three databases were explored to detect where the sex differences were in stroke: (i) a prospective, population-based cohort study, UK Biobank, was used to identify major risk factors in women and men with stroke; (ii) an individual participant data meta-analysis was performed on five large international stroke randomised controlled trials to examine sex differences in outcome and treatment; and (iii) an Australian cohort study on young stroke survivors was examined for sex differences in returning to unpaid work. The statistical methods used for this work were logistic regression, cox regression and multivariable analysis. Analysing results by sex and gender in medical research is important because this may lead to personalised prevention and treatment strategies. In stroke, researchers need to consider enrolling more women in clinical trials and to report results by sex.en_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydneyen_AU
dc.publisherFaculty of Medicine and Healthen_AU
dc.publisherSchool of Public Healthen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
dc.subjectStrokeen_AU
dc.subjectsex differencesen_AU
dc.subjectpolicyen_AU
dc.subjectindependent participant dataen_AU
dc.subject.otherincludes published articlesen_AU
dc.titleSex differences in strokeen_AU
dc.typePhD Doctorateen_AU
dc.type.pubtypeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU
dc.description.disclaimerAccess is restricted to staff and students of the University of Sydney . UniKey credentials are required. Non university access may be obtained by visiting the University of Sydney Library.en_AU


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