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dc.contributor.authorFernando, Shayani Erandika
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-11
dc.date.available2019-09-11
dc.date.issued2019-09-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/21082
dc.description.abstractSituated within the intersections of stereotomy (the art of cutting solids), the evolution of machine tools and structural design principles; this research investigates contemporary digital stereotomic practice, both its historical context and current contribution to the Architectural discipline. This dissertation develops modular prototypes of subtractive fabrication methods with a focus on utilising variations of osteomorphic blocks (based on Abeille’s vault) for interlocking joint systems. Interlocking assemblies in the construction industry have gained acceptance for their versatility and reduced labour costs in comparison to traditional brick and mortar methods. The ease of assembly and disassembly make using these mortar-less interlocking blocks for arched and vaulted spaces appropriate. Past methods of stereotomic practice and emerging multi-axis robotic fabrication techniques are investigated in relation to case studies of specific structural conditions. These include a novel approach towards robotic fabrication of wave jointed blocks, columns and arches, followed by beam and cantilever structures. Examining the machine generation of specific geometries of wave block modules forms a base to establish criteria for testing material outcomes. This thesis aims to highlight the value of ‘crafting’ through robotic technologies. The structural prototyping workflows, quantitative test results of failure mechanisms and contribution to historical knowledge of this thesis, can extend to the wider manufacturing industries and heritage conservation departments. Here, the implementation of the design and production workflows of interlocking self-supporting assemblies can be used to adapt past methods of traditional stone carving and assembly techniques. Further extending to the construction of spaces in extreme climates and unstable conditions where flexibility of structures is beneficial. Allowing humanity to progress further and explore new environments and habitats.en_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydneyen_AU
dc.publisherSchool of Architecture, Design and Planningen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
dc.subjectStereotomyen_AU
dc.subjectIntersectionsen_AU
dc.subjectInterlockingen_AU
dc.subjectStructural Designen_AU
dc.titleThe Machine and the Arch: Explorative Intersections in Stereotomic Practice, Structural Design and Robotic Crafting of Dry Stone Interlocking Joint Structuresen_AU
dc.typePhD Doctorateen_AU
dc.type.pubtypeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU
dc.description.disclaimerAccess is restricted to staff and students of the University of Sydney . UniKey credentials are required. Non university access may be obtained by visiting the University of Sydney Library.en_AU


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