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dc.contributor.authorRanjan, Sanchana Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-05
dc.date.available2019-09-05
dc.date.issued2019-04-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/21023
dc.description.abstractThis research explores whether international trade can drive sustainable development by investigating whether labour provisions in regional trade agreements can influence gender equality at work. Such research is critical to justify incorporating labour provisions and alleviate fears that these provisions were only included for protectionist or window dressing purposes. The International Labour Organisation has highlighted the paucity of research on the effectiveness of labour provisions. Additionally, the credibility of existing studies is reduced by the lack of information on labour provisions and working conditions, and a strong theoretical framework to explain causation. To address this gap in knowledge, two normative tools were developed to explain causation. Drawing from existing studies and autopoietic systems theory, a theoretical framework was developed to explain how labour provisions could stimulate improvement in working conditions by influencing context-specific factors instrumental to the trade-labour standards relationship. Using theories of information regulation and autopoietic systems theory, a regulatory model was developed to explain how a labour provision could change social norms by regulating compliance information on labour standards. A case study was conducted on the labour provision in the US-Cambodia Bilateral Textiles Agreement, primarily selected because information was available on its operation and working conditions in Cambodian garment factories. The two normative tools revealed that labour provisions can influence gender equality at work by targeting context-specific factors instrumental to working conditions and regulating the creation, quality and utilisation of compliance information. However, labour provisions can succumb to the neoliberal drive for economic growth and efficient markets, domestic policies of repression and local cultural norms. When this occurs, labour provisions effect superficially positive changes such as compliance with a statutory minimum standard while obscuring deeper issues such as discrimination and repression, and the maintenance of an underclass of informal workers. More positively, labour provisions can empower women to seek changed social norms at work through transparency and education.en_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydneyen_AU
dc.publisherSydney Law Schoolen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
dc.subjectLabour lawen_AU
dc.subjectGender discriminationen_AU
dc.subjectLabour provisionsen_AU
dc.subjectSustainable developmenten_AU
dc.subjectUS Trade Agreementsen_AU
dc.subjectCambodian garment industryen_AU
dc.titleRegulating Labour in and through International Trade: A focus on the influence of labour provisions on gender equality at work and sustainable developmenten_AU
dc.typePhD Doctorateen_AU
dc.type.pubtypeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU
dc.description.disclaimerAccess is restricted to staff and students of the University of Sydney . UniKey credentials are required. Non university access may be obtained by visiting the University of Sydney Library.en_AU


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