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dc.contributor.authorMaystorovich Chulio, Natalie Rebecca
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-14
dc.date.available2019-08-14
dc.date.issued2019-01-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/20904
dc.description.abstractThe exhumation of clandestine graves by NGOs and relatives of the disappeared involves human rights narratives and scientific forensic techniques. This research investigates the meaning generated by the exhumation and reburial of victims of enforced disappearance in Spain. The dissertation is theoretically anchored in symbolic interactionism, and explores how contemporary forensic techniques enhancing the evidentiary value of the body to testify enable human remains to be constructed as political and national subjects and mortuary rights are used to reconstitute relations between the living and the dead. The investigation utilised ethnographic data produced from participant observation, semi-structured interviews and documentary analysis. Exploring the ability of legal activists to forge links globally through legal and forensic collaboration. The Law of Historical Memory was passed after successful lobbying to establish a legal avenue of recognition and access to documentation and sites for the purpose of exhumation and identification of the disappeared. The thesis provides an original contribution to the literature with respect to the continuing bonds that are established through the materiality of human remains, not simply the objects tied to life. The thesis offers significant contribution to ethnographic studies of forensic exhumations by addressing the involvement of Argentine national courts demands for exhumations. This reinforces human rights narratives, highlighting the capacity of national courts to pressure foreign legal and political systems. The movement aims to change the legal architecture that has prevented investigations and recognition of the past, contributing to the continued discrimination of the vanquished. The contribution to the literature on transitional justice is distinctive given the exhumations are not connected to legal investigations and the attribution of guilt. The thesis argues the exhumation serves wider needs for justice and reconciliation through the acknowledgment of the past as part of an inclusive national narrative through the use of forensic evidence. It is the resignification of the dead in the public sphere to revive the political struggles of the past.en_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
dc.subjectMateriality of human remainsen_AU
dc.subjectexhumationsen_AU
dc.subjectforensicsen_AU
dc.subjectHuman Rightsen_AU
dc.subjecttransitional justice and memoryen_AU
dc.titleThe Materiality of Human Remains in Unearthing Spain’s Repressed Past: What Exhumations Tell Us About Law, Forensics, Human Rights and Memoryen_AU
dc.typeThesisen_AU
dc.type.thesisDoctor of Philosophyen_AU
usyd.facultyFaculty of Arts and Social Sciences, School of Social and Political Sciencesen_AU
usyd.departmentDepartment of Sociology and Social Policyen_AU
usyd.degreeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU
usyd.awardinginstThe University of Sydneyen_AU


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