Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorShu, Chen-Chun
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-13T05:44:43Z
dc.date.available2019-08-13T05:44:43Z
dc.date.issued2018-12-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/20892
dc.description.abstractObjective: To examine associations between caregiving and specific health outcomes in older men. Methods: Men aged 70 years and older from the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP) were assessed at wave 1 (2005-2007, n=1705) and three follow-ups. Data were collected on self-reported caregiving status, physical and mental health and nutrient intake. Both hospital admission data and death record were obtained from administrative databases and linked to CHAMP data. Results: At wave 1, 11% older men were caregivers, of whom 158 were looking after their wives or partners. In cross-sectional data analysis, being a caregiver was associated with increased likelihood of reporting anxiety symptoms (OR: 2.32, 95%CI: 1.39-3.87). No longitudinal associations were found between changes in caregiving status and changes in depression or anxiety status. A significantly lower rate of planned overnight admission (elective admission) was found in caregivers compared to non-caregivers (rate ratio: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.45 – 0.83, p= 0.002). From 2005 to 2015, 495 deaths were observed with an average follow-up of 7.39 years (SD= 2.95). Using time-dependent Cox regression models, we did not find any significant difference in all-cause mortality between caregivers and non-caregivers. At follow-up, new caregivers were less likely to have improved diet quality (OR: 0.28, p< 0.05) and less likely to maintain adequate diet quality (OR: 0.36, p< 0.05). New caregivers were also more likely to have a decrease in fibre intake (OR: 2.41, p< 0.05). Discussion: The findings would suggest that support services provided to older male caregivers should be individualised to caregivers’ perceptions and focus on strategies that will assist older men who have high levels of anxiety associated with caregiving. It is reassuring that caregiving did not appear to have an adverse effect on mortality or emergency hospital admissions. Our anecdotal observation is that older carers are often advised to “take better care of themselves” based on the belief that caregiving is believed to have a substantial negative impact on their health. Our study would suggest that the effects of caregiving on health may be subtler.en_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydneyen_AU
dc.publisherFaculty of Medicine and Healthen_AU
dc.publisherConcord Clinical Schoolen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
dc.subjectphysical activityen_AU
dc.subjectnurtient intakeen_AU
dc.subjectmortalityen_AU
dc.subjecthospitalisationen_AU
dc.subjectmental healthen_AU
dc.subjectcaregivingen_AU
dc.subject.otherincludes published articlesen_AU
dc.titleThe Health Effects of Caregiving in Older Menen_AU
dc.typePhD Doctorateen_AU
dc.type.pubtypeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU
dc.description.disclaimerAccess is restricted to staff and students of the University of Sydney . UniKey credentials are required. Non university access may be obtained by visiting the University of Sydney Library.en_AU


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record