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dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-30
dc.date.issued2018-07-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/20814
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is about applying a multidisciplinary approach in order to better understand the labour process. To do this the author, a mechatronic engineer, had to understand what is medically known about labour and become familiar with the clinical process. This thesis explores literature related to pregnancy and labour, as well as the literature covering clinical assessments and the related supporting technology. This literary understanding was enhanced through experiences in the clinical environment. This work then combines literature and clinical learnings to best apply an engineering approach to the development of initial models and simulations. Normal labour progression was modelled by deriving formulas that focused on quantifying the forces required to dilate the cervix. These were tested using measurements from the literature and showed promise for use with clinical data. Describing the process used to develop monitoring technology, this thesis steps through the process of developing a technology that would allow women in labour to be monitored without impact to their comfort or interfering with the birthing process itself. In addition, methods used to collect clinical data from 81 women in labour are described. The thesis then combines the learnings discussed, to describe the developed methods for automatic contraction identification and models to better quantify the forces presented in labour to achieve cervical dilatation. This work provides value for both medical and engineering disciplines. It contributes to the understanding of normal labour progression and the forces exerted in labour. It shows how a multidiscipline approach can be used to better understand and solve long standing medical problems. Most importantly, this work will improve outcomes for mother and baby as it is developed with further research and commercial applications in mind.en_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydneyen_AU
dc.publisherFaculty of Medicine and Healthen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
dc.subjectpregnancyen_AU
dc.subjectlabouren_AU
dc.subjectcervixen_AU
dc.subjectprogressionen_AU
dc.subjectmedical deviceen_AU
dc.titleQuantification of forces exerted through labouren_AU
dc.typePhD Doctorateen_AU
dc.type.pubtypeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU
dc.description.disclaimerAccess is restricted to staff and students of the University of Sydney . UniKey credentials are required. Non university access may be obtained by visiting the University of Sydney Library.en_AU
dc.description.embargo2021-01-25


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