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dc.contributor.authorReyes, Rachel Custodio
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-28
dc.date.available2019-06-28
dc.date.issued2019-06-28
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/20652
dc.description.abstractAs the world has increasingly become more globalised, so has the complexity of economic interconnections across the world. The prevailing economic trade structure suggests that goods and services consumed at a certain geographic location embody not only inputs (materials, capital and labor) sourced worldwide but also implications that span across countries and territories. This work traces the direct and indirect, as well as within country and trans-boundary, wellbeing implications of economic activities in different countries and regions of the world throughout the supply chains. Adopting a novel quantitative interdisciplinary approach, socio-economic multi-regional input-output (MRIO) analysis is implemented in globally linking wellbeing of workers and the society participating in the supply chains with international trade flows. The role of supply chains in achieving a more sustainable human development is investigated by analyzing global employment and PPP-adjusted income footprints, global gender pay gap footprints and social welfare footprints. In contrast, when human development is threatened by disasters with cascading supply chain impacts, the recovery strategy may involve accessing supply chain relations to restore human welfare. In effect, this research delivers quantitative and theoretical assessment of trade’s role on affecting what ultimately matters to humankind – sustainable human development. Studies of this kind require efficient compilation of high-quality multi-region input-output tables and a system for handling large-scale data. To deliver on these, the virtual laboratory is envisioned as an enabler for conducting policy-informing and behavioral change-inducing analyses such as this work.en_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
dc.subjectsustainabilityen_AU
dc.subjectsocial footprinten_AU
dc.subjectinput-output analysisen_AU
dc.subjectgender pay gapen_AU
dc.subjectdisasteren_AU
dc.subjectinternational tradeen_AU
dc.titleTowards Understanding the Role of Global Supply Chains in Achieving a More Sustainable Human Developmenten_AU
dc.typeThesisen_AU
dc.type.thesisDoctor of Philosophyen_AU
usyd.facultyFaculty of Science, School of Physicsen_AU
usyd.degreeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU
usyd.awardinginstThe University of Sydneyen_AU


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