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dc.contributor.authorBlake, Katharine Frances
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-21T03:51:40Z
dc.date.available2019-06-21T03:51:40Z
dc.date.issued2019-06-21
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/20587
dc.description.abstractThis thesis offers a new context for understanding three of Donatello’s statues—the marble David c.1408–12, and the bronzes of David and Judith, c.1450s. By weaving together art history, religious history, classical scholarship, and humanist learning, this study shows that the sculptures were part of a penitential tradition using violence in art to provoke ethical engagement and encourage its viewers to pursue virtue. Crucially for historians’ understanding of ‘propaganda,’ this interpretation challenges an overly secular approach to politics, suggesting that Donatello’s sculptures were emblems of the Florentine polis because they entwined spiritual and political values. It also demonstrates that a shift away from this way of thinking happened during Lorenzo de’ Medici’s time, much later in the fifteenth century than historians might expect.en_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydneyen_AU
dc.publisherFaculty of Artsen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
dc.subjectpropagandaen_AU
dc.subjectarten_AU
dc.subjectDonatelloen_AU
dc.subjectpoliticsen_AU
dc.subjectrenaissanceen_AU
dc.titleSacred–Political Imagery in Fifteenth-Century Florenceen_AU
dc.typePhD Doctorateen_AU
dc.type.pubtypeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU


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