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dc.contributor.authorLydecker, Henry William
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-29
dc.date.available2019-03-29
dc.date.issued2019-03-29
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/20220
dc.description.abstractTicks represent significant public health threats globally, however their complex ecology makes control and management difficult. This is doubly true in Australia, where almost nothing is known of the ecology of the Australian paralysis tick Ixodes holocyclus. My PhD thesis investigates the ecology of I. holocyclus, and explores the interactions between I. holocyclus and possible host species near urban areas, the climatic and environmental niche that I. holocyclus occupies in Australia, and a public health dilemma that has driven renewed interest in I. holocyclus: the question of Australian Lyme disease. I found that there is little support for common conceptions that native bandicoots are the primary drivers of urban tick populations, and that while bandicoots are likely to be important, so too are introduced animals. By using species distribution models, I show that the range of I. holocyclus will likely contract with climate change. And by using media analysis, I show that Australian concerns about possible Lyme disease originate in media coverage of a tennis player getting the disease. By incorporating tick-host ecology, tick landscape ecology, and analysis of media coverage, my thesis provides an in-depth exploration of fundamental aspects of I. holocyclus ecology, and demonstrates the importance of interdisciplinary approaches in understanding the ecology of parasites. I have shown that both native and introduced animals can support I. holocyclus populations near cities, yet further investigation is needed to understand how this species interacts with the various communities of host species and environmental conditions across its vast geographic range.en_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydneyen_AU
dc.publisherFaculty of Scienceen_AU
dc.publisherLife and Environmental Sciencesen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
dc.subjectticksen_AU
dc.subjectparasitesen_AU
dc.subjectixodesen_AU
dc.subjectecologyen_AU
dc.subjecthostsen_AU
dc.subjecturbanizationen_AU
dc.titleTicks, hosts, and Ticks, Hosts, and Urbanisation: The Ecology of the Australian Paralysis Tick Ixodes Holocyclus in Sydney, NSW: the ecology of the Australian paralysis tick Ixodes holocyclus in Sydney, NSWen_AU
dc.typePhD Doctorateen_AU
dc.type.pubtypeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU
dc.description.disclaimerAccess is restricted to staff and students of the University of Sydney . UniKey credentials are required. Non university access may be obtained by visiting the University of Sydney Library.en_AU


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