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dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Abigail Catherine
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-22T03:49:01Z
dc.date.available2019-03-22T03:49:01Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-18
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/20190
dc.description.abstractThis project interrogates how hospitality operates as a concept and a political practice. Since the concept’s first sustained appearance as an object of social and political thought some thirty years ago, scholarship has centred almost entirely on the figure of the migrant and a critique of sovereign states and their often inhospitable attitudes and practices. This dissertation breaks with this tradition in two crucial respects. First, I attend to the governmental aspect of hospitality. I show how hospitality is being (re)conceptualised, indeed problematised, as a concern for security in our era of global flows and mobility. This dissertation thus contributes to current debates on governmentality through an extended analysis into the power relations of hospitality. Second, I focus on hosts rather than migrants, and in particular, on French citizens who host migrants today in defiance of laws forbidding it (and named “solidarity delinquents” as a result). Drawing on in-depth interviews, I show that France’s “solidarity delinquents” are savvy to the state’s instrumentalisation and politicisation of hospitality. Yet they too have a use for politicising both hospitality and themselves. My central claim is that defiant acts of hospitality constitute ways of “becoming political”. Specifically, the citizen-hosts are trying to reimagine what it means to be a French citizen and to recuperate and revive the French republican legacy of fraternity and equality. The crimes that they commit hold the state to account; yet at the same time, these help the citizens to care for themselves by reclaiming their own national and political identity. The historical and empirical analysis in this thesis captures the crucial yet undertheorised role that hospitality plays—as sometimes ally of the state and at other times of dissenting citizens—in shaping competing conceptions of what citizenship and identity can and does mean at certain times and places.en_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydneyen_AU
dc.publisherThe Faculty of Arts and Social Sciencesen_AU
dc.publisherSchool of Social and Political Sciencesen_AU
dc.publisherDepartment of Government and International Relationsen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
dc.subjectHospitalityen_AU
dc.subjectCitizenshipen_AU
dc.subjectSolidarityen_AU
dc.subjectPolitical Theoryen_AU
dc.subjectNational Identityen_AU
dc.subjectRepublicanismen_AU
dc.titleCrimes of Solidarity: on Hospitality, the State, and the Citizenen_AU
dc.typePhD Doctorateen_AU
dc.type.pubtypeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU


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