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dc.contributor.authorBrooks Pribac, Teja
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-06
dc.date.available2019-03-06
dc.date.issued2018-09-28
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/20097
dc.description.abstractThis thesis joins a vibrant interdisciplinary conversation about animal subjectivity. Specifically, it addresses the question of whether nonhuman animals possess capacities for a human-comparable feeling of grief and spiritual experience. Historically, a substantial amount of philosophical discourse, particularly in the Western tradition, has centred on attempts to articulate a framework of defining features that would capture the presumably distinct nature of the human. Grief and spirituality have jealously been guarded as such uniquely human attributes, and despite nonhuman animal grief, as of late, having been admitted into scholarly discourse, the potency of the feeling fails to be recognised as equal to human grief. This thesis examines the discourse on grief and spirituality, identifying conceptual and methodological approaches that have contributed to the prejudice against nonhuman animals. By exploring the underlying commonalities that enable the experience of grief and spirituality in both human and nonhuman animals, the research finds that experiential diversity likely manifests on an individual rather than on a species level. A vast and growing body of knowledge concerning attachment and loss, and the shaping of animals’ (human inclusive) experiential realities more broadly, elucidates the role of the implicit forces at work for the emergence of grief and spirituality. Simultaneously it evidences that a human-comparable interpretative dimension, while it may colour the experience in distinct ways, is not necessary to experience both phenomena deeply. In both academic and popular discussion, in fact, considerations of grief and spirituality in nonhuman animals continue to be tainted by anthropocentric philosophical questions, failing to recognise the significance of the more fundamental psycho-biological processes at the root of these experiences. A more integrative approach, as presented in this thesis, offers a stronger theoretical base for the consideration of grief and spirituality across species with ensuing ethical implications for human treatment of other animals and the developing of scholarship.en_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydneyen_AU
dc.publisherThe Faculty of Arts and Social Sciencesen_AU
dc.publisherSchool of Literature, Art and Mediaen_AU
dc.publisherDepartment of Studies in Religionen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
dc.subjectanimalsen_AU
dc.subjectgriefen_AU
dc.subjectspiritualityen_AU
dc.subjectevolutionary thanatologyen_AU
dc.subjectspeciesismen_AU
dc.subjectveganen_AU
dc.titleAnimal Grief and Spirituality: Cross-Species Perspectivesen_AU
dc.typePhD Doctorateen_AU
dc.type.pubtypeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU
dc.description.disclaimerAccess is restricted to staff and students of the University of Sydney . UniKey credentials are required. Non university access may be obtained by visiting the University of Sydney Library.en_AU


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