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dc.contributor.authorBolitho, Samuel
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-22
dc.date.available2019-01-22
dc.date.issued2018-08-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/19851
dc.descriptionIncludes publicationsen_AU
dc.description.abstractParkinson’s disease (PD) is an increasingly prevalent neurodegenerative disease affecting older adults. Motor symptoms, including tremor, rigidity and tremor were classically predominant. However, troublesome non-motor symptomatology are known to impair quality of life for patients with PD and there carers. Sleep-wake disturbances are gaining attention in PD encompassing disturbances of the circadian, homeostatic and ultradian sleep systems. These symptoms have been linked to the troublesome problems of cognitive deficits, mood disturbance and visual hallucinations. Mechanisms exploring the interaction of sleep-wake disturbance and other non-motor symptoms in PD are not well understood. Bidirectional causality between sleep-wake disturbance and concomitant symptoms in PD provide insights into common chemical and neural mechanisms which prior to the development of therapy, must be understood. Furthermore, sleep-wake disorders in PD at present provide a maker of early diagnosis for which future disease modifying treatment can be targeted. However objective and reliable measurement techniques are yet to be devised in this field. This thesis aims to utilise the objective measurement of sleep-wake disturbances across the circadian, homeostatic and ultradian sleep systems in PD through four empiric experiments to help inform our understanding of these critical symptoms. While the usefulness of self-report data is not doubted as a means of engaging the patient and hearing their voice they cannot serve the same identification and measurement uses of objective data. Given our ageing population, the need for diagnostic, predictive and sensitive monitoring biomarkers in Parkinson’s disease has never been greater. Objective, accurate and reliable measurement techniques, as demonstrated in this thesis, underpins further research in this field.en_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
dc.subjectParkinson's diseaseen_AU
dc.subjectsleep-wake disturbanceen_AU
dc.subjectmeasurementen_AU
dc.titleThe Objective Measurement of Sleep-Wake Disturbance in Parkinson's Diseaseen_AU
dc.typeThesisen_AU
dc.type.thesisDoctor of Philosophyen_AU
usyd.facultyFaculty of Medicine and Healthen_AU
usyd.departmentBrain and Mind Centreen_AU
usyd.degreeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU
usyd.awardinginstThe University of Sydneyen_AU


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