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dc.contributor.authorHansen, Claire Gwendoline
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-12
dc.date.available2015-08-12
dc.date.issued2015-01-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2123/13667
dc.description.abstractAbstract: This thesis argues that Shakespeare is a complex system and that the framework of complexity theory can be of use to Shakespeare studies and literary studies more broadly. Moving from smaller subsystems to the global Shakespeare system itself, this thesis explores how Shakespeare’s narrative, play composition, pedagogy and cultural presence can be re-examined through a complexivist lens. By adopting different methodological approaches across the chapters, this thesis also refines the application of complexity theory and trials implementation strategies for the humanities. The Introduction offers a foundation for complexity theory in literary studies, including core characteristics and methods of implementation. Chapter One reads dance in A Midsummer Night’s Dream as a series of complex interactions which create or respond to moments of crisis or ‘bounded instability’. Chapter Two conceptualises Titus Andronicus as a self-organised complex system and interrogates three self-organising interactions: the relationships between co-authors; authors and space; and fictional and environmental space. Chapter Three’s pedagogical focus reconsiders the role of unexpected emergence in the teaching of Shakespeare and in The Merchant of Venice. Chapter Four examines the function of system attractors in the real-world system of Shakespeare in Stratford-upon-Avon and in the systems of Julius Caesar. Each chapter demonstrates complexivism as an illuminating framework for Shakespeare studies, identifying complex behavioural patterns in the plays, their contexts, and in literary criticism. This thesis also demonstrates complexity theory’s interdisciplinary applicability in fields of inquiry including the philosophy of dance, authorship studies, ecocriticism and cultural studies. ‘Shakespeare and Complexity Theory’ offers a novel and valuable framework to enrich our understanding of Shakespeare, and lays the foundation for complexity theory in Shakespeare studies and the humanities.en_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Sydneyen_AU
dc.publisherFaculty of Arts and Social Sciencesen_AU
dc.rightsThe author retains copyright of this thesis. It may only be used for the purposes of research and study. It must not be used for any other purposes and may not be transmitted or shared with others without prior permission.en_AU
dc.subjectShakespeareen_AU
dc.subjectcomplexity theoryen_AU
dc.subjectsystemsen_AU
dc.titleShakespeare and Complexity Theoryen_AU
dc.typePhD Doctorateen_AU
dc.type.pubtypeDoctor of Philosophy Ph.D.en_AU
dc.description.disclaimerAccess is restricted to staff and students of the University of Sydney . UniKey credentials are required. Non university access may be obtained by visiting the University of Sydney Library.en_AU


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