Now showing items 655-674 of 718

    • Vaccines – but not as we know them: An ethical evaluation of HPV vaccination policy in Australia 

      Rae, M; Kerridge, I (Wiley for Public Health Association of Australia, 2011)
      Objective: To show how systematic ethical evaluation of public health policy may reveal issues of moral significance for critical examination. Method: Using Australia's human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program as ...
    • Values as ‘modest foundations’ for medicine 

      Little, M; Gordon, J; Lipworth, W; Markham, P; Kerridge, I (the University of Buckingham Press, 2014)
      Medicine and healthcare have been around for thousands of years, but we seldom ask why they are so important. It seems self-evident that we should seek relief of suffering from some institution in the society in which we ...
    • Values in breast cancer screening: an empirical study with Australian experts 

      Parker, Lisa; Rychetnik, L; Carter, SM (BMJ Publishing Group, 2015)
      Objective: To explore what Australian experts value in breast screening, how these values are conceptualised and prioritised, and how they inform experts’ reasoning and judgement about the Australian breast-screening ...
    • Values, ethics and the law--Issues for practice and education 

      Little, M (Medknow Publications, 1998)
      ABSTRACT For many years, thoughtful medical practitioners have concerned themselves with the place of health services and medicine in their social setting. They have recognized that there are genuine moral dilemmas which ...
    • Values, foundations and being human 

      Little, M (CUP, 2014)
      The word 'values' is widely used, and it is usually assumed that everyone knows what you mean when you use it. It refers to certain commitments to which you hold, certain attributes that guide behaviour and underpin your ...
    • VALUES-BASED MEDICINE AND MODEST FOUNDATIONALISM 

      Little, M; Lipworth, W; Gordon, J; Markham, P; Kerridge, I (Blackwell Publishing, 2012)
      Values-based medicine can be interpreted in economic terms as the medicine that delivers the most benefit for a given cost. But values have another meaning in philosophy. They refer to the basic commitments that justify ...
    • Viewpoint: Separating the Science and Politics of “Obesity” 

      Carter, SM; Walls, H (American Medical Association, 2013-02-14)
      Last month, JAMA published a systematic review and meta-analysis of the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and all-cause mortality. The researchers, led by Katherine M. Flegal, PhD, of the US Centers for Disease ...
    • The Views and Experiences of Smokers Who Quit Smoking Unassisted. A Systematic Review of the Qualitative Evidence. 

      Smith, Andrea L; Carter, SM; Dunlop, SM; Freeman, B; Chapman, S (Public Library of Science, 2015-05-26)
      Background Unassisted cessation – quitting without pharmacological or professional support – is an enduring phenomenon. Unassisted cessation persists even in nations advanced in tobacco control where cessation assistance ...
    • Views of health journalists, industry employees and news consumers about disclosure and regulation of industry-journalist relationships: An empirical ethical study 

      Lipworth, W; Kerridge, I; Morrell, B; Forsyth, R; Jordens, C (BMJ Publishing Group, 2014)
      Bioethicists and policymakers are increasingly concerned about the effects on health journalism of relationships between journalists and private corporations. The concern is that relationships between journalists and ...
    • The Violence of Care: An Analysis of Foucault’s Pastor 

      Mayes, C (University of Denver, University of Central Arkansas, York College of Pennsylvania, and Lebanon Valley College, 2010)
      Michel Foucault begins his 1977-1978 lecture series–Security, Territory, Population–by stating that he will investigate the vague concept of biopower introduced in The Will to Knowledge and Society Must Be ...
    • Virtuous acts as practical medical ethics: an empirical study 

      Little, M; Gordon, J; Markham, P; Rychetnik, L; Kerridge, I (Wiley Blackwell, 2011)
      Rationale, aims and objectives  To examine the nature, scope and significance of virtues in the biographies of medical practitioners and to determine what kind of virtues are at play in their ethical behaviour and ...
    • Vulnerability and Marginalized Populations 

      Wrigley, A; Dawson, Angus (2016-04)
      Public health practitioners attempt to identify and then remove, or at least reduce, threats of harm. However, harm does not affect everyone in the same way. Some people and communities are resilient, whereas others are ...
    • Walking the tightrope: communicating overdiagnosis in modern healthcare 

      McCaffery, K; Jansen, J; Scherer, L; Thornton, H; Hersch, J; Carter, SM; Barratt, A; Sheridan, S; Moynihan, R; Waller, J; Pickles, K; Edwards, A (BMJ Publishing Group, 2016)
      Overdiagnosis and overtreatment have serious implications for individuals, healthcare systems, and society,1 2 and effective strategies are urgently needed to help the public, clinicians, and policy makers address this ...
    • The Walking Wounded calls for a rethink of what we most value 

      Komesaroff, P; Kerridge, I; Lipworth, W (The Conversation, 2014-05-27)
      Starting with Karl Marx, many thinkers have pointed out that the creative potential of the capitalist economic system comes at a cost – the lack of inherent ethical scruples to limit the inexorable logic of profit and ...
    • Waste not, want not: new organ donation policy could save lives 

      Bendorf, A; Newson, A.J. (The Conversation, 2015-02-12)
      Australia has never had a great deceased organ donor rate – and it fell last year. But proposed guidelines from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) could change how donor organs are obtained and allocated ...
    • Watching the Responsibility Clock: Medical Care, Ethics, and Medical Shift Work 

      Arnold, M; Kerridge, I; Komesaroff, P (Taylor & Francis, 2016)
      The article by Dubov and colleagues (2016) evokes the inadvertent possibility of adverse ethical outcomes arising from the worldwide trend toward mandated work practices. These outcomes include the undermining of key ...
    • A Week Can be a Long Time in Mental Illness 

      Ryan, C; Callaghan, Sascha (Fairfax Media, 2011-08-20)
      An erosion of the Mental Health Act is worrying. The safeguards on our human rights hang by a slender thread. In July last year, everyone in NSW had one such safeguard cut away. Its removal, by a simple bureaucratic ...
    • What factors determine the choice of public engagement undertaken by health technology assessment decision-making organizations? 

      Wortley, S; Street, J; Lipworth, W; Howard, KA; Dickinson, H; Robinson, S (Emerald, 2016)
      Purpose: Public engagement in health technology assessment (HTA) is increasingly considered crucial for good decision-making. Determining the “right” type of engagement activity is key in achieving the appropriate ...
    • What is health promotion ethics? 

      Carter, SM (CSIRO, 2012-04-01)
      What does it mean to think about the ethics of health promotion? When most of us think ‘ethics’ we think of the Human Research Ethics Committee applications required for research projects. But I’m thinking of something ...
    • What is it like to be a doctor in immigration detention centres? 

      Chan, A; Kerridge, I (Guardian Australia, 2014-09-16)
      I am often asked questions about my work as a general practitioner in the Christmas Island and Nauru immigration detention centres. Are the conditions as bad as they say? Is the health care adequate? Are they genuine ...